Screen Shot 2015-05-28 at 4.08.09 pm

Flume Drops 'Some Minds', Featuring Miike Snow's Andrew Wyatt

After an age too long, local legend Flume has dropped a new track, Some Minds. Featuring Miike Snow's Andrew Wyatt on vocals, the song is accompanied by a mind-bending, trippy video that takes place in the Sydney Opera House.

The description on Youtube reads that it's a "result of a collaboration between Flume, the Sydney Opera House and respected director Clemens Habicht (Tame Impala, Bloc Party, The Presets). It features dance and choreography from Australian Ballet member Callum Linnane. Granted exclusive access to the iconic Australian building, the shoot took place throughout the night one Saturday in April."

You can see Flume at the Future Classic 10 year party this weekend. Only if you already have tickets though 'cos it sold out weeks ago.

wsn-gemini

What So Not Prepare To Send Flume Off In Style With 'Gemini'

wsn-gemini

What So Not have released the first single from their final EP as a duo, titled Gemini. Following the release of their EP by the same title and subsequent North American tour (including a set at Coachella), Emoh Instead will become the sole proprietor of the duo, whose fame has been undoubtedly boosted by Harley Streten’s individual success as Flume.

There’s no doubt though, that in What So Not we always saw a slightly more experimental, more fun-loving side of Flume’s production. The release of this incredible first single featuring the irrepressible George Maple shows that if nothing else, Streten intends to go out with a banger or two.

[soundcloud width="750" height="200"]https://soundcloud.com/whatsonot/what-so-not-gemini-ft-george-maple[/soundcloud]

flume

Have two new Flume tracks just been leaked?

flume

It seems that two brand new Flume tracks have been leaked onto Soundcloud. The first track, That Look, sounds like it features fellow Future Classic signee, George Maple, who appeared and performed the song in Flume's set at this year's Listen Out. The second (incomplete) track, Oddity, follows Harley's staple sound of bouncing beats and rushing synths. Get in quick before they're taken down!

Update: Oddity appears to be co-produced by Flume's fellow What So Not member, Emoh Instead. 

Another update: Both tracks have since been taken down from Soundcloud. Sorry, we told you to get in quick. 🙁 

[soundcloud width="750" height="200"]https://soundcloud.com/newshyt/flume-that-look[/soundcloud]

[soundcloud width="750" height="200"]https://soundcloud.com/newshyt/flume-oddity[/soundcloud]

 

mt rushmore_flume

The American Electronic Music Scene & Australia’s Growing Influence

mt rushmore_flume

America’s music scene is in a constant and blissful state of evolution. One of the fastest growing trends across the country is electronic music, and with hundreds of big-name and underground artists producing every style and subgenre you can name, its growth doesn’t seem to be stopping any time soon. In recent years, the skyrocketing popularity of large-scale music festivals has noticeably changed electronic producers’ experience in the creation and performance of their sound. Not only do the crowds expect to see acts they already know, the gigantic line-ups have also allowed artists from around the world to showcase themselves in an entirely new setting, leaving behind a growing influence on American artists and the scene itself. Acts like Flume, Emoh Instead (and their collaborative outfit, What So Not), Ta-ku, Chet Faker, and Wave Racer are only a few examples of Australians who are beginning to make huge waves over in the States, and it’s about time.

Flume_USA

My own introduction to Australia’s electronic scene came a couple years ago, on a lazy day while scrolling through Spotify. After an endless train of searches, I ended up on Flume’s page and listened to his most popular hits, Holdin' On and Insane (feat. Moon Holiday). This quickly led me to check out the rest of his album and then go back to the top and start again three more times. I had no idea that years later, I would still be bothering my friends and family by insisting on hearing the album again and again, trying to breakdown each song and instrument for them, hoping to convert them to the Australian sound. I had never heard anything like it, nor been so affected by a series of strange, broken sounds and haunting, tribal melodies, and I wasn’t the only one.

While at a small show in northern California about a year ago, one of the openers played Flume’s remix of Disclosure’s You and Me. It was the first time I’d heard one of his songs played live, and naturally I made a commotion. After it ended and the crowd was able to take a breath, all I was able to hear were the people around me asking each other what song they had just heard, and who the artist was. It was a clear standout in the rest of the set. You would’ve thought I was working for Future Classic by the way I was shelling Flume’s name out to everyone. Getting to witness an entire venue’s first introduction to a piece of Australia’s sound was magical, and our immediate, frantic embrace only grew as the months went on.

flume+disclosure3

The mainstream electronic music scene in America nowadays, specifically trap music, follows several trends that are worth noting when comparing it to the stuff migrating from Australia. Hear me out. First, you won’t find much trap in the States without a snare on the 2’s and 4’s and a rolling hi hat coming in after the first half of the “drop”. These are givens. To go a little broader though, the underlying vibe of the songs often seems to be the same as well. The rhythms hit the off beats hard, inspiring you to throw your body around and pump your fists in the air. The vocal samples used are very provocative, usually short phrases or words meant to stimulate the crowd, make them feel in control of the song, and offend the older generations. Basically, America likes grime. We judge the success of our raves by the number of frowning ‘stank’ faces and the music’s level of aggression or badassery. This is where Australia’s recent assimilation has really opened our eyes.

stankface

An example of a 'stank face'

[soundcloud width="750" heigh="200]https://soundcloud.com/wave-racer/wave-racer-streamers[/soundcloud]

The musical formulas I described still hold true with many artists such as Yahtzel, L D R U, Sable, Basenji, and even Flume, but the big difference lies in their creation of melodies and overall intentions for their songs. They are able to match the high level of energy without a sense of anger or inflated ego found in so much of America’s electronic sound, but instead replace it with an uplifting feeling of celebration and joy. For lack of better words, Australia’s music is optimistic. Just listen to any one of Wave Racer’s tracks and you’ll know what I mean. The melodies within the songs are complex and beautiful. It feels like listening to actual music, rather than just a cool beat. Even though the colossal scale of some popular American music may shadow it at times, it fully compensates with its vast, musical detail and melodic styling.

[soundcloud width="750" heigh="200]https://soundcloud.com/whatsonot/sets/tell-me-rl-grime-x-what-so-not[/soundcloud]

A perfect comparison of the two styles comes in the form of an actual collaboration between our countries: RL Grime and What So Not’s Tell Me. The build up, created by What So Not, features warped vocal samples and tribal instruments layered over each other. It creates an ominous and yet elevating vibe, which sharply contrasts with RL’s drop. Only using one leading synth and three notes, he completely changes the vibe to be very minimal and hard-hitting. This collaboration shows the difference in technique and musical atmosphere of our countries’ sounds, and as you can tell from listening to Tell Me, they go quite well together.

What So Not’s ever-growing number of collaborations with American artists such as Dillon Francis and Skrillex, Flume’s wildly successful North American tour, and Ta-ku’s heavy involvement with LA-based label HW&W are only a few examples of the major moves Australians are making in the States. With their unique and refreshing approach to electronic music, they’re blowing the dust off America’s EDM book.

 American music often feels like a one night stand.

Australian music feels like your soul mate.

artworks-000087750795-87n1yc-t500x500

Hear what Flume does with Arcade Fire's 'Afterlife'

44d4973c

One would've thought it would be hard to beat Flume's year in 2013, but he's doing a good job of competing with it in 2014. He recently played three sold out shows in New York, stunned a packed out Lollapalooza crowd and delivered remixes for Lorde, Seekae and Chet Faker. Now he's adding to that with a remix of Arcade Fire's Afterlife from their 2013 record Reflektor. Flume chops and manipulates Win Butler's vocals while laying down a subtly climatic, ambient sound scape. Still, it maintains the same uplifting vibe of the original. It's a little bit softer than Flume's past work but no less effective.

[soundcloud width="750" height="200"]https://soundcloud.com/flume/arcade-fire-afterlife-flume-remix[/soundcloud]

flume_seekae_test_and_recognise

Flume reworks Seekae's 'Test & Recognise'

flume_seekae_test_and_recognise

Flume has put his midas touch on yet another already-killer song, this time turning Seekae's Test & Recognise into gold. It's still as hauntingly alluring as the original- just slightly tweaked to make it a little more club-ready. Listen below:

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/flume/seekae-test-recognise-flume-re-work[/soundcloud]

firstimpressions_july7_2

First Impressions 7 July

firstimpressions_7july

This week's First Impressions has something for everyone. There's EDM, pop, disco, electronica and soul. Unfortunately, sometimes when the best things in life come together it can be catastrophic. We're unable to agree on anything this week, as Ariana Grande's banging anthem fails to please and Bon Iver falls at the mercy of one recurring sound. Meanwhile Flume and Chet Faker's 3481st song together impresses some and leaves a sour taste for others.

Ariana Grande Feat. Zedd- Break Free

Bianca: Ariana has reached Grande heights around the world and I just can’t understand why. Her voice grates me in a way that I can’t describe and the higher she goes, the lower my volume goes. Just as Zedd entered the building at the 3:17 mark and it sounded like the song was peaking to something a little more exciting, it promptly ended. Well, I wasn’t entirely wrong about the exciting bit. 1  

Hannah: In need of a drinking game? Shots, shot, shots, every time this song features in a marketing campaign over summer. Plot twist? You’ll spend summer drunk and it’ll be better than remembering hearing this song. 2

Sam: I feel like the whole EDM meets pop thing is such a tired formula. But, Zedd and Ariana just get this one so right and it comes down to two things. The first is Zedd has no ego in this. He forgoes huge drops in favour of stellar verses and never overwhelms with bass. The second is Ariana has a ridiculous voice and this is the first time we’ve heard it in full force. This could be the biggest selling song of the year. 3

Lizzie: I am just going to pretend that this wasn't in First Impressions this week. I actually had to play this on the lowest volume in my room - I just couldn’t let my housemates catch me listening to this. 1.5

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/canalselgomez/ariana-grande-break-free-ft-zedd-official[/soundcloud]

Nile Rodgers- Do What You Wanna Do

Bianca: Goddammit, I’m trying so hard not to dance to this song but my platform shoe-clad feet are thinking otherwise. Do what You Wanna Do is certainly a shameless little bit of fun. 2.5

Hannah: A decade in the making from the man himself, I kind of expected a little more. It’s got all the components of a ready-made disco sensation, electric guitar, catchy rhyming lyrics you can sing to slash guess at while succumbing to disco fever, a creepy voice over here and there, and when all else fails a whistle, but it just never really takes off? 2

Sam: So many warm fuzzies on this one. After five decades Nile Rodgers is still the king of disco. Yeah it’s a little corny but that synth-line puts the fattest smile on my face, so screw it. I can’t give this one a score. Rodgers is a legend, he’s paid his dues. As someone born in the ‘90s, it’s far beyond me to judge the king of disco.

Lizzie: Not my vibes at all. This feel like a dodgy karaoke song playing on a caribbean cruise ship. Please excuse me while I go jump ship. 1

Meg Mac- Roll Up Your Sleeves

Bianca: A lovely little Sunday School tune. Expect big things from Meg Mac. 3

Hannah: *Tactically side steps comparison to Adele.* It's nice. 3 Hannah's Pick 

Sam: Sometimes I feel like artists are trying to be so tricky nowadays that they’ve lost the art of writing a great tune. Roll Up Your Sleeves is a classic example of what can be achieved when you keep it simple. Mac sounds amazing and the song is optimistic and classy. 3.5

Lizzie: She has got these Nora Jones/Duffy soul vibes, but with a youthful kick. What a tune - I’m not usually a ballard gal, but this lady has got a gift. Bring on the next hit! 4

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/megmacmusic/meg-mac-roll-up-your-sleeves[/soundcloud]

Chet Faker- Gold (Flume re-work)

Bianca: Seems a bit same-old same-old for me. It doesn’t seem as if Flume has evolved this song much from the original and feels less like a re-work and more of a repeat. 2

Hannah: 2zooey

Sam: Another Flume and Chet Faker track. It was something unique at first but now it’s become about as common as going to the bathroom. Flume adds a skittering aesthetic with pulsating bass while Chet croons away over the top. Am I excited? Nup. I just fell asleep and dribbled a little. 2

Lizzie: Flume has once again put his Midas Touch on an already golden track. Chet Faker, you make me weak at the knees. Every song he produces is engulfed with this infectious energy and emotion, and Gold is no different. You may even convert me to beards.  4 Lizzie’s Pick

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/neighbors-hate-us-future/chet-faker-gold-flume-re-work[/soundcloud]

Basement Jaxx- Never Say Never

Bianca: Watching Bend It Like Beckham last night (I regret nothing) and hearing the soundtrack made me miss the old Basement Jaxx. In saying that, the piano chords and grooving synths are enough to get it onto my party playlist. Bianca's Pick 

Hannah: Didn’t we already hear this one? 2

Sam: It’s a nice pleasant take on deep house. It sounds like Duke Dumont, Disclosure, Ben Pearce but it’s got no hint of Basement Jaxx’s identity in it. If I heard it in a club I’d love it I’m sure but right now just nothing sticks out to me. Blah. 2.5

Lizzie: Love love love the vocalist. There’s something very smooth about him. It’s definitely a step up from any of the other new tracks they have released this year, but would have loved for them to pushed the boundaries a little more. C’mon, surprise me. 3.5

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/basement-jaxx/never-say-never[/soundcloud]

Bon Iver- Heavenly Father

Bianca: I feel I can’t properly score this song because it seems my speakers are broken. Oh wait, it’s meant to sound like that? All I can say is this song would certainly not be an ideal remedy to a hangover. Thankfully, I didn’t drink last night and can appreciate Vernon’s beautiful-as-ever song amongst the mess of repetitive lulls of noise. 2.5

Hannah: This week. Just go home new music, you’re drunk. This is exactly what happens when Bon Iver sings over your 6th grand band rehearsal. While I love Bon Iver with the deepest crevice of my heart, and in many respects the redeeming feature of this song is indeed Bon Iver himself and his undeniable voice, I can’t help but want more. It feels kind of... lazy. 2.5

Sam: Justin Vernon strikes something for me that no other songwriter at the moment does. He always writes with a hint of sadness yet induces this peering glimmer of sunshine.  As a fan, it’s great to hear another track from Bon Iver but also bittersweet knowing that another LP may be a while off. 4 Sam’s Pick

Lizzie:Is the tape recorder stuck? There seems to be a terrible whiney sound on repeat, destroying what could have been a beautiful Bon Iver track! My ears are still ringing. 2

©2017 THE INTERNS MUSIC, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.