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CarlyRaeJepsen

Album Of The Week: Carly Rae Jepsen – ‘E•MO•TION’

CarlyRaeJepsen

While pop is essentially used to define popular music, there is actually a distinct lack of pure pop albums these days – the type that the Madonnas and Kylies of the world perfected back in the day. In 2015, most artists you’d call popstars are off dabbling in EDM or R&B rather than serving up pure pop. There’s a strong exception to that rule and that’s Taylor Swift who delivered a knockout with last year’s 1989 which traded purely in ‘80s-tinged pop. Now, we have Carly Rae Jepsen – the purveyor of one of pop’s most viral hits, Call Me Maybe. In many ways Jepsen’s third album E•MO•TION is similar to 1989, but somewhat surprisingly, it’s also better.

E•MO•TION could have easily been your usual Max Martin, Dr. Luke pop affair. In fact, Martin wrote for the album but didn’t make it on the final tracklisting. Instead, the album gathers together an unusual, erring-on-alternative list of musicians including Dev Hynes, Vampire Weekend’s Rostam Batmanglij and Ariel Rechtshaid, who worked on HAIM and Sky Ferreira’s last LPs. They sit alongside usual hitmakers like Sia, Greg Kurstin and Shellback but together they have churned out a cohesive effort of polished pop-songs that manage to tick radio’s commercial boxes as well as appeal to more leftward leaning fans.

While Call Me Maybe sold 15 million copies, E•MO•TION doesn’t ever feel like an attempt to recreate it. It doesn’t try to disown it, but Jepsen seems to want to deliver more – a great album from beginning to end. Opening with the howling saxophone of Run Away With Me, the album serves up twelve near-perfect pop tunes one after the other – some with huge choruses, other relying on gentler, more hushed moments.

Nothing sounds like what we’re hearing on the radio right now even though the ridiculously catchy melodies may trick you into thinking it’s generic. Even first single I Really Like You brings a little more human to its commercial appeal with big, pounding drums and a repetitive chorus that emulates the endearing annoyances of Call Me Maybe.

While I Really Like You is the obvious hit here, it’s not the most likeable. The record has no shortage of golden tunes, striking as one of those albums that could easily have seven or eight singles if Jepsen had the star-power of Swift or Katy Perry. Sia’s contributions Making The Most Of The Night and Boy Problems are euphoric, girly tunes that, unlike many Sia-penned hits, manage to distance themselves from sounding like the songwriter. Both of the tracks are laden with funky guitar licks and ‘80s programmed drums – effortlessly melodic, but interestingly so. On top of that you have second single Run Away With Me which easily has the most anthemic chorus on the album, chanting with rushing energy.

The more unexpected, odd moments are the ones that are likely to hook you to E•MO•TION as a full body of work. Hynes is no stranger to pop, having produced for the original Sugababes MKS, Kylie Minogue and Solange Knowles, so it’s no surprise that he delivers a knockout here. All That is the LP’s subtlest moment, slowing the tempo right down and allowing Jepsen to sit right back on the beat. It’s here that we get to really hear the tone of her voice for the first time, maybe in her career, as she delivers a sweet, sultry performance.

Vampire Weekend’s Batmanglij is less known for his commercial work (although he did contribute to Charli XCX’s Sukcer) and his production on Warm Blood is suitably weird and warped. It’s also one of the album’s highlights with drunk synths and pitched-down vocals, turning Jepsen into an electronic disco-queen. “Warm blood feels good, I can’t control it anymore,” she sings in the chorus, creating an aptly warm, comfortable atmosphere. It may be the oddest track on the album but it’s also the one that plays to Jepsen’s strengths the best. It capitalises on her giddy lovelorn lyrics and softens her girlish voice while simultaneously making her cool.

When dissecting the record, the choice of producers is a main focus but that doesn’t mean that Jepsen is merely a robot on the album. She’s spoken openly about how she wanted to make E•MO•TION a cooler, more credible record and she chased down a lot of the producers like Dev Hynes, who she was attracted to after Solange’s Losing You. It doesn’t feel like Jepsen has lost herself in the search for credibility, rather she’s found a better way to relay her tales of boy-crushes and butterfly-ridden romances. None of the dorky charm of Call Me Maybe is lost on this record – on Let’s Get Lost she sings “Baby let’s get lost/I like that you’re driving slow/Keepin’ my fingers crossed/That maybe you’ll take the long way home.” It’s the same kind of what-could-be dreaming that made Call Me Maybe so daggy and adorable.

Over 100 songs were reportedly worked on for this album, eventually whittled down to 12, and yet E•MO•TION is a good example of keeping a pop album on track. When making commercial records, everyone from Rihanna to Madonna have made the mistake of cramming as many genres into 45 minutes as possible but here Jepsen sticks to her guns, revolving around that ‘80s pop sound and barely ever deviating. It’s a consistently tight album that never serves up a dud, never allowing you the chance to come down from your sugar high and doubt Jepsen’s comeback.

When a pop album is this good – full of big hooks, delicious licks and euphoric melodies – there’s no need for snobbery. Jepsen has been very smart in covering all angles, playing both to the radio and the alternative “high-brow” listener. It feels like a guilty pleasure but there should be no guilt in devouring this. E•MO•TION is not only the best pop album of the year but in the upper-echelon of releases this year and the best part is none of us were expecting it.

E•MO•TION is out Friday, 21st August. 

 

 

AlbumOfTheWeek_Julio

Album Of The Week: Julio Bashmore – ‘Knockin’ Boots’

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Julio Bashmore broke almost three years ago with Battle For Middle You, following it up with Au Seve. At the time, it was a pre-Disclosure climate whereby the club scene was starting to come to terms with the re-emergence of ‘90s house music and the mainstream’s fascination with EDM was only growing.

In 2015, Bashmore is releasing his debut album in a very different climate. Disclosure have had a massive album with Settle, tropical deep house is the charts’ chosen genre right now and artists from Mary J. Blige to Drake have had a go at the deep house thing. It’s almost as if this was Bashmore’s plan – to wait until the hype around him had died down and the genre he championed was in tatters before dropping a near-perfect dance record that reminded everyone how good he was years ago.

Knockin’ Boots isn’t Settle. It doesn’t have a huge single like Latch, it features no big names and it probably won’t get in reach of the top of the charts but that doesn’t mean it’s any less brilliant. Knockin’ Boots is great because it’s come at a time when the genre it champions has grown tired. It reminds us that this kind of ‘90s-borrowing house music’s best quality is that it’s euphoric, romantic and feel-good.

From the records opening moment, Bashmore makes it clear that it’s going to be all those three things. “We danced and danced until we fell in love” is the mantra he sets for the album, sampling The Jones Girls’ Dance Turned Into A Romance. It sets a steady beat that rarely lets up for the whole album – a throbbing, bass-heavy, club-ready stomp. From there we enter into Holding On – a retro sounding track featuring the vocals of Rocnation-signed singer Sam Dew. It’s an infectiously joyous tune that takes cues from disco with a swirling, orchestral synth-line.

One of the greatest things about Knockin’ Boots is that it bleeds colour. Every song has charismatic elements whether it be the cheeky bass-line of For Your Love or phone ring of Bark. Everytime the smile fades he adds something in to make it that bit more memorable. It’s a tactic that works on nearly every track. 

There are a number of tracks here that would work well on radio if Bashmore desired, which he probably doesn’t. Since bursting onto the scene he’s worked with Jessie Ware, helping him to hone his pop sensibilities and work with soulful, melodic vocalists. Let Me Be Your Weakness with London singer BIXBY is the album’s biggest pop moment with a big, soulful chorus – the type that British (and to a lesser extent Australian) radio craves.

It doesn’t ever sound like he’s trying to make hits on Knockin’ Boots though. No song sounds like it could be plucked to be the single nor does Bashmore let a more-known vocalist take the reigns and outshine him. This is his album and every track has Bashmore stamped on it. While he’s grown since Battle For Middle You and embraced the use of a vocalists there are moments on the album where he goes back to his roots. What’s Mine Is Mine is an instrumental banger that clangs with a metal-sounding beat and Bark borrows from Jersey club to work up a frenetic pace. These moments never feel out of place on the record, melding perfectly with the more accessible, soulful numbers.

Euphoria is the common thread on Knockin’ Boots and whether he’s churning out club numbers or soulful jams he makes sure that comes across. On Rhythm Of Old he uses spirituality and gospel influences to bring that feeling while on She Ain’t he uses a disco-ball turning, sped-up funk track. The whole thing is feel-good, but never explicitly so. This isn’t “put your hands in the air,” type dance music, it’s subtler than that. He’s worked on carefully flavouring each song so that you could spend the entire album feeling giddy in the stomach and falling in love. It’s appropriate that he ends the album with You & Me built around the simple feelings of a relationship – the type that make you never want to be apart from someone.

Some dance records are alienating because they’re steeped in nostalgia for a dance scene passed by that you don’t quite understand or because they’re trying to be complicated for the sake of it. The production and soundscapes of Knockin’ Beats are textured and finessed but at large they’re easy to listen to. Bashmore has tipped his hat to ‘90s house, nailed the feeling and put his own stamp on it while delivering a record that’s damn fun to listen to.

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Album Of The Week: MS MR – ‘How Does It Feel’

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When New York City duo Lizzy Plapinger and Max Hershenow aka MS MR released their debut album Secondhand Rapture they had time to test the water. They had already released an EP, had a blogosphere hit with Hurricane and were building hype as newcomers. The album featured a collection of previously released tracks and already felt familiar straight off the bat. With album number two – it’s a totally different game.

How Does It Feel is a totally new set of songs and places MS MR as an established act rather than a new acts trying to prove themselves. Unfortunately, as a band you really never stop trying to prove yourself unless you’re 73 and have played Wembley over 15 times. As such, How Does It Feel has to set MS MR up as band that can go the distance and create a whole new set of highlights. For the most part, album number two does that. It’s a confident pop record with plenty of big choruses ready to be devoured by the masses. What’s even more encouraging is you can tell that their sounds evolving.

From the album cover to the opening ten seconds it’s clear that the duo had disco in mind while formulating this record. Instead of ditching their old sound in search of Nile Rodgers, they lightly pepper each track with a certain disco-feel. In that way, it’s a small disco ball that turns on How Does It Feel, but it’s there nonetheless. Album opener Painted opens with a flurry of dancefloor ready keys before eventually descending back into the dark, looming sound that was the signature of their debut. The album doesn’t enter as explicitly back into the disco world again apart for on the shiny Reckless which boasts one of the effortlessly groovy choruses of the set.

When they’re not taking it the dancefloor, the pair are casting a dark shadow with tunes that weigh heavy on the heart. Plapinger’s voice is naturally dense and raspy. It lends itself easily to darker songs and that’s the common mode of the album. On the title track she sings “How does it feel with my teeth in your heart?” They deliver a message like that while still maintaining their pop sensibilities. This album rarely enters into ballad territory, rather taking its heartbreak to the dancefloor.

On Criminals, her “hearts getting dark” yet that’s translated into the most euphoric pop moment of the record. Recently CHVRCHES’ Lauren Mayberry discussed with Radio 1 that their heavy lyrics would be too much coupled with equally heartbreaking instrumentals so they juxtapose the two. It’s the exact same situation here and for the most part they get the light and shade right. They nail it on Criminals with a howling, sparkly instrumental. In contrast the heavy-beated Leave Me Alone is exhausting.

The relationship Plapinger depicts throughout is one that’s rotting at the core. She closes the album singing, “Everyone keeps asking if we’re ok/The truth is we’re not but I don’t know what to say.” It’s somewhat gut-wrenching that you don’t get the resolve that would’ve complimented the album’s darkest moments but that’s a little idealistic – changing the course of her relationship for the sake of a musical happy-ending. The whole time she toys with the idea of whether she should stay or go. On Tripolar she sings, “It’s the terrible truth that hurts – should I even stay?” We never really get the answer to that question but as frustrating it is, it’s that tension that really suits dense sound of the album.

So how does it feel? Well, considering how dark and depressing the lyrical content is, it actually doesn’t feel to bad. If somebody handed the lyrics to you and asked you to guess the music, you’d be forgiven for thinking it was a cold, piano-driven affair. That wouldn’t be half as interesting as How Does It Feel. It’s a record with a strong, pop-heart that no doubt be a firm festival favourite over the next few months. The downs of life are so much more palatable when you’re able to dance through them and MS MR understand that.

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Tame Impala AOTW

Album Of The Week: Tame Impala – ‘Currents’

Tame Impala AOTW

Tame Impala go pop. Tame Impala do disco. Tame Impala are sexist. Tame Impala channel Bee Gees on drugs. We’ve been warned hundreds of times since Kevin Parker started speaking about Currents that it was going to be different. But, before we go any further, we need to put this in perspective. Currents is many things, one of those is different but it’s not a monumental shift. We’re not talking The Black Eyed Peas adopting Fergie or The Beatles discovering LSD, instead frontman Kevin Parker is growing up and the sound of Tame Impala is effortlessly moving with him.

Currents comes five years after the West Australian’s debut LP Innerspeaker so should it really be a surprise that the record depicts an evolving band? If there’s one big change at the heart of Currents, it’s the changes in Parker’s life that have stopped him singing in metaphors and revealed an introspective, personal songwriter. “They say people don’t change but that’s bullshit, they do,” he sings on the album’s hallmark moment Yes, I’m Changing. It’s a heart-tug of a lyric that would have been a shock on the two preceding LPs but within the context of this one it sounds completely natural.

Yes, I’m Changing is the song that’s going to divide people. It echoes the Bee Gees more tender moments with a distinct clarity both lyrically and musically and as such detours into alt-rock fans most dreaded territory – pop. The song explains the aftermath of a relationship with a relaxed peacefulness. It’s immediately followed by Eventually – another song about that same relationship with Melody Prochet of Melody’s Echo Chamber. Interestingly these two songs are both the most precise and open of the album in terms of feelings. “But I know that I’ll be happier and I know you will too,” Parker sings, letting his relationship go with an elated optimism.

That same optimism runs through the whole record and brings with it an honest beauty. There are some complex ideas being explored here but when it comes down to it, Parker always traces it back to a core ethos – Let It Happen. The seven-minute epic album opener perfectly predicts the album with a relaxed gentleness and flair for experimentation. There’s electronic elements, RnB hooks and classic rock n’ roll influences that are all scattered through the album but find themselves sharing a space on Let It Happen.

The band’s RnB vibes first poked their head-out on Feels Like We Only Go Backwards but they return here with a far more prominent role. ‘Cause I’m A Man is an after-dark jam with a discreet sensuality to it. Tempo-wise Love Paranoia also sits in that lane, acting as an almost counterpart to the band’s Like A Version cover of Outkast’s Prototype. Parker’s falsetto has become a weapon and when he sings, “girl, I’m sorry,” he’s as convincingly smooth as Miguel.

The electronic moments are also more explicit too. The album’s weirdest track Past Life channels experimental Brian Eno but familiarises it with a floating, staple Tame Impala chorus. The Moment is also peppered with lightly-pulsating beats while Gossip warps with the kind of synth-work that would make Nosaj Thing envious.

That doesn’t mean that the job of the psych-guitar is made redundant. The guitar hook of The Less I Know The Better is the album’s sweet spot and probably one of the most, if not the most, triumphant part of the album. It’s that song that most people will find hard to dislike no matter what they think about the band’s “new” sound.

Diehard fans of Lonerism won’t be completely at a loss with Currents. The murky, gritty haze returns on Reality In Motion but with a much more acute feel for pop vocal melodies. The track could easily be an entry point for old fans trying to connect with the new music. If you trace back from her, you’re likely to find the psychedelic synths and crunching guitars are still there – they’re just not the main character anymore.

If Lonerism was about personal introversion then Currents is about interaction. He’s aware of how people will react to the album on closer New Person, Same Old Mistakes (“I can just hear them now, How could you let us down?”) and on Disciples he details the degradation of a friendship. This is still weed-infused music but it’s no longer atmospheric and spacey. This is real shit and surely as far as songwriting goes it’s a massive goal-score for Parker to connect on a level of honesty.

It’s never easy to follow-up an album that garnered worldwide critical praise and transformed the band to a festival mainstage player but the greatest thing about Currents is Parker sounds undeterred. He’s taken a newfound confidence and found the guts to explore musical influences that he would’ve once though too alienating for Tame Impala fans. Couple that with emotional complexity and you’ve got an album that’s heartwarming, exciting and challenging. You may get the shift in sound straight away or it might take you a while to come around but once you do you’ll recognise there’s far more to explore here than any other Tame Impala album. Better yet it sounds like they’re only moving forward and that’s exciting when a songwriter with as many ideas as Parker is in the driver’s seat.

NINE OUT OF TEN

Listen to Currents here

 

Album_Miguel

Album Of The Week: Miguel – ‘WildHeart’

Miguel

When Miguel released his breakthrough sophomore record Kaleidoscope Dream in 2012 it took a little while for the momentum to build. It was immediately clear to critics that the album was great but while the mainstream tastes were shifting further to RnB it took a little while for Miguel to be completely accepted. His 2013 Grammys performance of Adorn was a big moment for him in his rise. It announced to everybody who didn’t already know that the world had a supreme male RnB vocalist, the likes of which had not been seen since, perhaps, D’Angelo.

So what does Miguel do now that the genre he rode to fame with has flooded the mainstream to the point where Selena Gomez is even doing it? He takes a left turn. Miguel’s third LP WildHeart is closer to soulful rock n’ roll than it is RnB, as synths are traded for howling guitars and reverb is introduced. You won’t find the smooth sheen of Adorn on this record and maybe that’s the record’s greatest strength – it allows you to discover a different element to Miguel.

That’s not to say WildHeart is a total departure from the RnB genre. It’s still sensual, smooth and at times beat-driven, but from its opener a beautiful exit, it’s immediately clear that it’s a far more organic, rough listen. “We’re going to die young,” he sings a beautiful exit, echoing a long-established rock n’ roll sentiment of freedom. That idea of being free, whether it be sexually or mentally is something that binds each song on the album.

Kaleidoscope Dream was a sexually-charged record and WildHeart is really no different in that sense. “Confess your sins to me while you masturbate,” he sings on The Valley over dirty, grinding synths. It’s the most explicit track on the album and the instrumental suggests that. Similar themes re-emerge on other songs on the album but never to that degree. On Waves he wants to “ride that wave,” as he sings on the funky, playful track. It’s times like these that you actually have to read the lyrics to realise the lyrical content. He’s so damn smooth he sings everything with careful tenderness.

First single Coffee is the most successful bedroom track. It’s an under-the-sheets, lyrical masterclass that oozes intimacy. While Miguel holds nothing back when it comes to singing about sex, it’s done with love, never sounding like a cheap, one-sided romp. The singer has been with his girlfriend for a decade, which probably explains that. “I wish I could paint our love,” he sings, surely melting girls hearts around the world.

Away from the sex, WildHeart paints Miguel as an outsider. Most of the music has this Harley-into-the-sunset toughness about it that’s both freeing and lonely. It’s the howling guitars and grungy production that do it but it’s also his autobiographical lyrics. “Too proper for the black kids, too black for the Mexicans,” he sings on the most introspective track What’s Normal Anyway? It’s a rare, intimate look into the makings of an on-the-surface suave Miguel. “I never feel like I belong,” he adds alongside a sonic-backing that’s happy to be contained.

The next song Hollywood Dreams sees Miguel let loose musically piling on the guitars and booming beats to help the track take flight. From this point on the rock guitars become his greatest weapon. He uses them to expand the soundscape which in turn allows him to let loose vocally. Even Cashmere Cat’s contribution …goingtohell rumbles with distorted instruments – a far cry from Cashy’s flashy remix of Do You…

California is the geographical heart of the album and it’s the best possible place to explore the idea of freedom. Miguel called it a “beautiful and hopeless place” in Rolling Stone and that’s exactly how it’s portrayed here. “Sweet California, bitter California,” he acknowledges on leaves backed by zero percussion, just hopeful and mournful guitars. Miguel surely knows all too well how it feels to be both jaded and inspired by the city.

Album closers leaves and face the sun are the two that really make you feel something for WildHeart. They have these big uplifting melodies that sweep from beneath and elevate the record into the clouds. In terms of imagery it’s as if he’s at the point on the motorcycle where he’s slowly becoming one with the horizon. Face The Sun is his love letter to his girlfriend and it’s the perfect closer in the sense that WildHeart paints an uncertain Miguel at many points but here he’s sure of one thing – “I belong with you.” A simple, perhaps cliché, statement but one that really resonates in a flurry muscular guitars and heart-stomping percussion.

Lyrically intimate yet sonically expansive and stadium-ready – that’s the heart of WildHeart.

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Albumoftheweek_Everything

Album Of The Week: Everything Everything – ‘Get To Heaven’

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Oddball alt-rock isn’t exactly an in-demand genre anymore. When British four-piece Everything Everything arrived on the scene with their debut Man Alive in 2010 they were surrounded by plenty of others delivering weird but accessible hipster music – Noah and The Whale, Wild Beasts, Friendly Fires, Klaxons. While Wild Beasts have continued their career-trajectory the others have faded into oblivion.

Given the rate of extinction for alt-rock bands of the late 2000s, Everything Everything, to their credit, sound remarkably relevant. On Get To Heaven they borrow experimental electronica elements of today and blend it in with their brand of alt-rock, which has always sat just slightly out of the box anyhow.

Their 2013 LP Arc was a breakthrough for the band. It pleased critics and also saw them shoot up festival bills as they refined their oddities to deliver singalongs like Cough Cough. Get To Heaven is not an overly different listen but there’s another dimension to it. There’s far more electronic moments and as such, it’s a bassier, more colourful record.

That’s both a blessing and a curse. Distant Past nails the balance and is their most personable record to date – a boisterous lead single. Other times they turn that odd-metre just a little too far like on Spring /Sun / Winter / Dread where frontman Jonathan Higgs manages a Limp Bizkit-esque rap.

Get To Heaven may be aesthetically colourful but its subject matter isn’t. It’s a record that explores people’s many beliefs and the violent state of the world. Speaking to NME frontman Higgs reflected on a violent 2014, in particular on US teen Elliot Rodger who killed six people in California. He explained why they named the LP Get To Heaven saying, “You go through all this horror, and as this ‘fuck you’ to the perpetrators, why not give it a really nice title? I wanted to try and rise above it and defeat that horrible shit with hope.”

As such, there’s two key emotions to the album – anger and hope. On Get To Heaven, Higgs sings “As the tanks roll by / Under a blood black sky / I’m thinking “where in the blazes did I park my car”,” with a kind of sarcastic frustration. On Zero Pharaoh the anger turns to violence (“Why don’t you smash him all up / Give me the gun…”). We’re relieved of that pent up emotion on the last track Warm Healer where he sings, “Just take a look outside the walls / And try to tell me something that’s good man.”

The latter ends with a beautifully uplifting synth of sweeps that bring the album to a mighty finish. If you’re going to present such weighty ideas, it’s always a relief to feel the light flickering through the clouds at the end.

In terms of the instrumentals, they’re not half as dark. Spring / Summer / Winter / Dread is pushed along by a tropical guitar-line and a killer hook. Blast Doors also has a playful guitar-line that recalls the early youthfulness of Blast Doors. In saying that, there are also songs like Fortune 500, which sound as if they were tailored for the Game Of Thrones soundtrack complete with dense, war-like horns.

While there’s plenty of fun to be had on Get To Heaven, it’s the sprawling moments of beauty that really stand out. The opener To The Blade is rooted by a gentle synth that elevates the melody and gives it a morning glow of sorts. The minimalistic moments on the album are the one’s where their songwriting is magnified and Higgs’ voice is showcased in the best light. Album highlight No Reptiles is an example of this. Built upon bubbling bass, Higgs’ wanders through with his soft falsetto, singing lines like “Just give me this one night, just one night to feel like I might be on the right path.” As the flickering synth comes in at the end, it feels both personal and triumphant without overwhelming with rock n’ roll guitars.

For an albums that deals with so many dark notions Get To Heaven is actually a thoroughly enjoyable listen. There are moments that really grab at the heart and there’s also songs that will cater will to sweaty, dance-ready festival crowds. There aren’t enough songs that stand on their own as well as some of Arc’s standouts did, but it’s an album that adds to the band’s capabilities without straying too far from their trademark sound.

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Album Of The Week: Hudson Mohawke – Lantern

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Scotland’s Hudson Mohawke has finally delivered Lantern, a euphoric, anthemic spectacle, where the highs are high, and the lows, though few and far between, are low.

In the six years since his debut album, Hudson Mohawke has gone from a smelly unwashed tramp making music in his parent’s basement to being a member of the genre defining TNGHT, a producer for Kanye West’s label, and a highly regarded member of the electronic music scene.

The material on Lantern is diverse as his career, with some tracks being sample based, some featuring vocalists, and some reminiscent of his earlier solo work, and some of his more rap oriented work with Lunice.

The brooding title track builds slowly into the accessible first single Very First Breath. Ryderz, a standout, follows, and is built around an old soul sample that eventually explodes into a frenzy of 808s and the sugary synths. ‘Scud Books’ features similar synths combined with massive horns.  We’re eased into Scud Books with prelude, Kettels, a surprisingly delicate composition that wouldn’t be out of place scoring a ballet.

Some of the tracks with vocals work really well, namely Indian Steps with Antony, and Deepspace with Miguel, because they feel like collaborations, rather than the singer just going in over a beat. Warriors, however, is a misstep with some cringeworthy lyrics.  The Jhene Aiko starring Resistence has moments of brilliance but overall, it is crippled under the burden of high expectations.  Wedged between these is Shadows, which is reminiscent some of the seizure-like tracks on Hudmo’s Satin Panthers EP, and Lil Djembe, which would have slotted in nicely on a TNGHT release.

The album finishes strongly with three huge, largely instrumental songs. Portrait of Luci is the closest thing on the album to Fuse from his debut, and System is, put simply, a rave banger.  He closes the album with Brand New World, a stadium rock ape-ing track with muted guitars, twinkling keys and chipmunked refrains.

Lantern is a tight, highly polished record of big beats and shimmering synths with more exciting moments than most.  While the commercial sheen of some tracks may alienate some of his original fans, Hudson Mohawke still retains his eclectic spark on ‘Lantern’, whilst being accessible to new fans.

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