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10things_nlv2

10 things we learnt at NLV Presents | International Edition

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Nina Las Vegas is currently touring around the country with three out-of-towners and one local boy as part of her International Presents series. UNiiQU3, Sam Tiba, Eclair Fifi, Swick and NLV giving punters a snapshot of the world’s upcoming electronic scene all in their own different ways.

We went to the gig in Melbourne and now are acting like crystal balls for all of you that still have NLV Presents to look forward to. Here are 10 things we learnt from NLV presents, not including our realisation that we have written so much about Nina recently that she’s potentially scared we’re stalking. It’s a valid fear.

NLV

1. Nina knows as International game-changer when she sees one

Earlier this year when the first NLV Presents toured around the country, Nina got her hands on a few Aussie game changers, most notably interns favourite, Tkay Maidza, who has exploded since then. This time around she’s set her sights further afield and delivered a motley but well-curated crew of artists. All of them are teetering on major success within the dance community – many of them relatively unknown in Australia until now. Each of the producers had something new and unique to offer. From Eclair Fifi’s bubblegum electronica to Sam Tiba’s hallowed Parisian beats, it all felt fresh.

2. UNiiQU3 & Nina were damn fine MCs

This wasn’t a play your set and get the shit out of there after a vodka kind of situation, each of the acts were there supporting each other and offering some damn fine MCing. Nina danced to the side of each of them like mother hen, amping the crowd with ease with UNiiQU3 also standing close-by. UNiiQU3’s dancing and spontaneous MC-ing made it look like each track played was made for the hip-hop world. Quite a feat when Eclair Fifi is playing PC Music.

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3. Nina debuted her and Swick’s new tracks and they were killer

Releasing her debut EP last week in what would seem impeccable timing, Nina was able to launch both club-bangers Don’t Send and Flash Auto with co-producer and partner in crime, Swick, near her side. With the space imminently filling with the energy of a crowd that seemed to already be familiar with the tracks’ peaks and troughs, both translated from computer to club with ease.

4. PC Music is the soundtrack of 2014

It seemed that all the naysayers needed was a bit of club love to be convinced that the kawaii and kitsch sounds of PC Music are actually quite delectable. First Swick dropped, Hey QT, which caused us to bowl over all our way out of the bathroom, and then Nina gave Sophie’s Lemonade a play and for a brief moment it felt like life would never be this good again. In no other song can you get down to the sound of fizzy lemonade and follow it up with 30 seconds of rave. In all seriousness though, the club is where sounds first arise and we’re pretty sure PC Music will be making its way into mainstream sound very soon. Katy Perry, Hey QT!

5. A Nina crowd knows How To Dress Well.

Unfortunately he wasn’t playing but the crowd and the acts were a well-dressed, dapper bunch of people. With many NLV t-shirts sold with the ticket, there was always going to be a fair share of Nina-clad people. There was also an abundance of emoji tees, which ensured that good feels were maintained for the night. The five artists also had some pretty impressive cloth too. Swick donned a New Age T-shirt, the new label by TEED, Sam Tiba was wearing a Nattofranco long-sleeved tee and Nina was wearing socks with mega-high heels that looked as if they hurt like shit.

Emojis

6. Eclair Fifi is just like a strawberry eclair

Just to clarify, the Scottish heartstarter does not look like an eclair but her set very much sounded like one. Her set was sugary and sweet, yet it held this density to it in the four-to-the-floor beat that permeated. She effortlessly skated through a number of genres from bubblegum electronica to hip-hop, still managing to maintain the same consistency.

7. Sam Tiba is a dark lord

Leave it to the Parisian to make things a little moody. Amongst a bunch of perky, tempo-raising artists, Tiba delivered a brooding set of tunes with pulsating beats and ghostly synths. A particular highlight was when he dropped fellow Parisian, Para One’s You Too, lifting the mood a bit for Swick who was to follow.

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8. Australians hold their own

Nina and Swick were the only Aussies on the International bill and they more than proved how good Australian electronic music is right now. Their two tracks together went down superbly, as previously mentioned, but both of them showed an acute awareness for what is going on overseas as well as what is happening locally. Swick’s track, Wishes, with Lewis Cancut and Tkay Maidza sounded like a bonafide anthem when it dropped and Nina’s tip of the hat to Peking Duk with her spin of High was an unexpectedly euphoric moment.

9. People do like good music

At one point in the night Nina thanked the crowd for liking “interesting music”, and it did feel good to be in a crowd of Australians lapping up music that wasn’t contrived or pretentious but rather feel-good. The crowd was pumping and certainly large enough to justify the decision to collect together the International lineup. And throughout the night, the bar remained mostly empty with the dancefloor the place to be. Melbourne, you did good. Real good.

10. We don’t know how to use a camera

Yes, we had a camera. And yes, we have nothing to show for it. It seemed our camera did not like our anarchic dance style and as such our photos are a blur, just like our night.

Note to future self: Wikihow ‘camera shutter speed’.

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Case in point.

10songs_10Oct_2

10 Songs You Need To Hear This Week: Jessie Ware, Röyksopp, Nina Las Vegas + more

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It’s the 10th of the 10th and why don’t we just throw another 10 in the mix, in the form of the latest and greatest tracks from the week. Love ‘em or loathe ‘em, these are the 10 most important things you should be listening to this week.

Anywhere – Young Franco x UV Boi

When two of the hottest young Australian talents team up, you know you’re in for a treat. Very much like the duo themselves, Anywhere is a fresh, youthful track that bounces along with a playful charm and vigour. Referencing R&B, trap bass, tropical disco funk and modern day sound samplings, it’s a smorgasbord of genres and textures that the boys have successfully amalgamated into the next dancefloor ditty.

Yumi Zouma- Alema

When you’re touring with Lorde, you know you’re doing something right. Fellow Kiwis, Yumi Zouma, are a fairly new band but by no means any less accomplished. First making an impact with their debut track, The Brae, they’ve now released the first track since their EP, Alema. Summery, hazy and evoking feelings of holiday nostalgia, the feather-light vocals and lush synths are carried confidently along by carefully-restrained ‘90s dance-keys. Feel free to add this one to your road trip playlist.

Years & Years- Desire

Sometimes it’s just inevitable that a band is going to breakthrough. Years & Years give us that feeling of inevitability with their dance/indie-rock/RnB crossover sound. They’ve got a sound that pleases the bloggers as well as having the potential to crossover onto radio. Desire is a perfect example for the aforementioned. It’s an upbeat, delectably melodic track with a tropical dance-vibe to it taking us to a jungle we haven’t seen since Nicki Minaj’s Anaconda track. Terrible timing to release this for British winter. Perfect timing that we get it for our Summer.

Danny L Harle- In My Dreams

We’re still unable to put a face to a name for any of these PC Music releases but who cares when they keep churning out the most mind-bending, divisive songs since Aqua’s Dr. Jones. The latest is from Danny L Harle and it’s actually one of the more digestible tunes we’ve heard from the label. In saying that, it still sounds like Siri’s debut single built on manic strings and climaxing toy beats. This may sound like a bad thing but it’s not at all. Brilliant, again.

Jessie Ware- Pieces

Oh, Jessie, Jessie, Jessie; you can do no wrong! Pieces is another bold statement from the London songstress as she executes each and every note and its subtle nuances like a true goddess. Bordering on pop territory but restraining just enough, Ware has pulled off another stunning ballad to add to the Tough Love collection. Just try not to shout this one from the rooftops.

https://soundcloud.com/jessieware/jessie-ware-pieces

Jerome LOL- Burton Hall

Jeremo LOL and Samo Sound Boy’s DJ Dodger Stadium record is one of our favourites of this year so it’s with absolute delight that we accept a new Jerome LOL song into our hearts this week. Burton Hall sees LOL step away from the abrasive personality of the DJ Dodger Stadium tracks and embrace a gently undulating tune that’s far softer but no less effective. The man is a genius in choosing the most easily swallowed vocal samples. Every time that high-pitched vocal makes an appearance we melt.

Nina Las Vegas & Swick- Flash Auto

Nina Las Vegas has dipped her toe into the world of production and the result is most excellent. Teaming up with fellow beatmaker, Swick, Flash Auto is an instant club banger that delves into trance heavy electro and is just anxious to be tested out on a real-life dancefloor. Nina’s sure to get people’s blood pumping and heart racing when she (hopefully) tests this one out at her NLV Presents tour, kicking off in Perth tonight.

BADBADNOTGOOD – Velvet  

No, we haven’t picked up a CD from your parents’ dinner party music collection. Toronto trio, BADBADNOTGOOD, have taken the jazz from the smokey club and transformed it into a modern day melody. While jazz can be a tricky one to get a hold of, why not just let the smooth grooves of Velvet get a hold of you, and allow them to whisk you away to yesteryear. Crack open a cigar and ask for another scotch on the rocks; you’re in this one for the long haul. Good times and great classic hits, brought to you by BBNG.

Shan Vincent de Paul – Some Girls

You heard the euphoric, full-bodied melodies of La+ch’s, Nights, and now the Toronto producer has laid his midas touch on Shan Vincent de Paul’s, lush, anthemic, Some Girls. Donate all your clothes to this collection bin, ladies and gentlemen, cos’ this tune is hot, hot, hot. Summer is here and de Paul’s smooth melodies will get you grooving all night long.

Röyksopp – You Know I Have To Go (Feat. Jamie McDermott)  

In a somewhat pensive reflection of their dance-pop extravaganza that was their pairing with Swedish singer, Robyn, Röyksopp’s latest offering, You Know I Have To Go provides a different mood to what we’ve seen from the Tromsø synth duo lately. They’ve taken the mood down several notches, reducing the thermostat from red hot and plunging it right down to sub-zero temperatures. Slow-building with a sense of foreboding, the frosty synths combined with Jamie McDermott’s imploring vocals create a tension that teeters on the edge, right until the very end, so don’t expect any kind of relief from the finale. In a statement about the song, Röyksopp has said:

“The attraction and the doubt; the dilemma as whether to succumb to one’s feelings or not. The sheer length of the track is meant to illustrate the prolonging internal struggle between reason and lust.”

Catch the song and the accompanying, ellipses-abundant lyrics here.

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DMA’s on Oasis comparisons, Danny DeVito & other Little Bastards

DMAs

DMA’s were hyped even before their debut EP was released. With a look that drew comparisons to English bands from Oasis to the Stone Roses, NME took no time in hailing the band as the next big thing and Aussie media has swiftly followed. Their self-titled EP ranges from firing bursts of angst to tender ballads that juxtapose their harsh image. Delete has become somewhat of an anthem in a very short time, with the Splendour in the Grass audience lapping up a chance to sing-along to one of the year’s most poignant melodies.

We sat down with DMA’s bass player, Johnny Took at BIGSOUND in Brisbane to chat about the copious comparisons, what’s next to come from the band’s tune-cannon and what DMA’s stands for.

How’s it all going? Are you stoked about the tour selling out?

Yeah, it’s pretty crazy. I‘m looking forward to going to Adelaide in particular. Adelaide will be cool.

Have you been before?

I have, I’ve got some family that live down there. But I’ve only played a couple of random shows so I’m looking forward to really understanding the music scene down there a little bit.

Does it feel like it’s all happened quite quickly? I guess, to us, it looks like it did but was there a bit more going on behind the scenes before you got signed by I OH YOU and it all took off?

Yeah, a lot more, man. We were writing for a good couple of years. Between the three of us, we could record everything because Tommy’s a drummer, and most of the songs are just done with drum loops when they’re demoed. It kind of has happened quickly but we were writing and recording for quite a while before that, which is good because now that things have happened quickly, we’re kind of prepared for it and not completely freaking out.

Did you have a plan going into it? Was it like, “we want to release this music?” or was it just for fun?

We planned it about 3 years ago. So I wanted to hide away, record and then drop some tunes. We had about 50 or 60 songs.

Are there songs in the EP that were written really early on in the piece?

Yeah, like Delete was written six or seven years ago. Some of the next tunes that we’ll be bringing out I wrote when I was like 19, 20. So they’re all kind of picked from a six or seven year period.

Do you think they developed in those years?

Some of them have, if you ever heard the originals. Like, Delete is completely different with electric guitars and shit at the start and also an extra part added. When I think about it, Your Low, which is on the EP, has as well. Some of them have grown and some of them haven’t needed to. You know, a song is a song. In hindsight, growing up in the time I was in when I wrote it, it doesn’t need to change. It represents that part of my life and vice versa.

Did it feel like, coming from different musical ventures like Little Bastards, that you wanted to separate, in your mind, DMA’s and have a different sound? Were you trying to channel something different?

Yeah, Little Bastard is more a live band. Like people, wasted and shit, big hoedowns and whatnot. DMA’s was always meant to be more of a studio thing. Eventually we had to cater for that for a live audience.

The songs are kind of melodically strong and sound like, as you said, they’re meant to be played out loud. Was melody a massive thing going into it? Particularly, vocal melody?

Yeah, when I was younger and writing songs, I used to just do verse/chorus things and they quickly got boring so now, when we write, I always like to have a verse, a pre chorus, a chorus and then a riff. So as long as there’s five strong melodies in a song, I feel like that should hold it together. Tommy and Mason are both really strong melody writers and if Mason brings in the tune, a melody he’s been working on, that stimulates you to have an idea you never had and vice versa.We find that we bounce off each other really well in that aspect.

How did the three of you come together?

I met Mason when I was doing solo stuff, like folk music. I met him at a folk festival when we were about 21. And then I met Tommy when I was 19 and in a psych band. He was the drummer and I was playing bass. And then the other two guys were songwriters in their own right and there wasn’t really enough for space for us to write, so that’s when Tommy and I first started writing together.

So you’ve obviously been through quite a few genres. Was there an influence or certain music that you were listening to at the time that kicked off DMA’s?

Nothing in particular but between me and my mates, and I’m sure it’s with everyone with the internet, you listen to so much music. Like, one day I’ll be listening to Doc Watson and Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, and then Neil Young and all of a sudden you start crossing into heaps of stuff like Primal Scream, Stone Roses (Tommy’s a big fan), Dinosaur Jr, The Jesus Mary Chain…all those noisy guitar bands but, like I said, the way I think of it, Little Bastards is classified as a country band and the only thing that makes it country is the arrangement.

The lines are a bit blurred.

Yeah, you can play any song. You can play Made of Stone by The Stone Roses and put a banjo over it and all of a sudden it’s a country song. A good song’s a good song, that’s what I’ve always believed. How you want to arrange it, that’s your prerogative.

Do you guys like reading on the internet “they sound like this”, do you find the comparisons interesting to have a look at?

I think it’s pretty funny when people say stuff like that. We get the Oasis thing a lot. I like Oasis but they wouldn’t be in my top 10, you know what I mean? It doesn’t really bother me too much.

I guess you get those comparisons because you’ve got a ‘90s aesthetic about yourselves. Do you think that’s because you’re drawing reference on growing up?

Yeah, I guess there’s a bit of nostalgia, like early ‘90s. I was in kindergarden in ‘94 and it’s just like all those tunes that were being played at the house while growing up.

Have you been surprised by the attention you’ve received overseas?

Yeah, it’s been surprising but at the same time, a few years ago when we started writing, we felt the songs were strong and we were attached to them. But like I was saying before, we never really thought or cared too much about what other people think. The beautiful thing about the internet is that anyone can have their opinion. It’s an amazing thing and also the beautiful thing about this world is that it doesn’t take a lot for it to go around. I’ve never really listened to other people’s opinions and I’m not going to start now.

So you’re headed off to CMJ this year?

Yeah, man!

Will this be your first overseas tour?

Well, I went to New Caledonia with Little Bastard one time, which was pretty cool. We’re apparently huge in New Caledonia? That’s the only time I’ve done it. I went to Europe when I was 19 and I came back and told myself I wasn’t going to go back until I was doing music. Because I felt like I was pissing my money against the wall, not playing gigs there and whatnot. That was about 6 years ago.

So I suppose in that way it feels like a massive achievement to be going back there and playing?

Yeah man, it’s exciting and the live set’s come together. So I’m just looking forward to going there and having a laugh really.

What’s the timeline then? The Aussie tour and then pretty much straight overseas?

Yeah.

Are you recording at the moment?

I’m always recording!

Do you have a next release in mind?

I think we’ve got a couple of things in the bag, but…we’re…actually, I don’t think i’m allowed to say too much about it.

We don’t want to get you in trouble.

*laughs* Yeah, I tend to do that a lot.

Is it sounding good, though? Can we ask you that?

I’m happy with it. It’s been a bit of a process. I love recording at home because you can take  your time. But I’m pretty happy with how they’re sounding. I feel like I’ve been in bands before where people can get really precious about that stuff, I think you can get too precious sometimes. I’ve seen so many amazing, beautiful songs by friends that never get released because they think about it too much or they’re scared of what people think.

5 Wacky Questions

Your band’s name is an acronym. What’s your favourite acronym?

Oh, DMA’s isn’t an acronym! It doesn’t stand for anything. It’s basically a bunch of letters we decided on with an apostrophe.

Favourite Danny DeVito movie?

Oh, woah…Matilda!

Will you be purchasing the newly unveiled Apple Watch?

Nah, I think it’s a bit lame, huh?

If you had to merge into another band to create a super group, who would it be?

There’s too many. Maybe War On Drugs would be pretty cool. Big fan of Kurt Vile.

Favourite board game?

*pause* I used to play a little Risk when I was younger…that was pretty cool. Twister can get pretty whack as well. I’m gonna go with Twister.

DMA’s have completely sold out their Australian tour. 

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Listen Out, Sydney – Wrap-up

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After a successful first year, Fuzzy’s IDM Festival, Listen Out, returned to Sydney and brought with it a lineup that cheered on more homegrown talent than 2013. Flume was always going to be a huge drawcard and as such, two of the dates on the Festival tour sold-out. Sydney wasn’t at capacity but it still had a huge crowd ready to enjoy a beautiful day of electronic music.

Electronic music has grown exponentially over the past few years and the fact that this year’s Listen Out was such an Aussie affair goes to show that Australia is at the forefront of the genre right now. Apart from a herd of fence-jumping fools, Listen Out drew an appreciative crowd for those who didn’t want to shred for Stereosonic or mosh at Soundwave. Turns out, it’s a nice middle ground to be in.

Refer to our key below for the ratings of each performance. We also added the appropriate foods to accompany each set, just ‘cos.

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shlohmo

LA producer Shlohmo is a late night music-maker. His music is dark, insulated and smooth- everything that 3pm on a sunny weekend isn’t. Dressed in all-black, Shlohmo looked every bit as uncomfortable as the crowd. The thick bass tried to hug centennial park but it was just too large of a field to capture the brilliance of his sound. Shlohmo was one of the best bookings on the Listen Out bill but he was definitely disadvantaged by an afternoon set. There will surely be no complaints about his club-sets while he is here. The man embodies the RnB/electronica crossover sound that everybody is trying to emulate at the moment. It’s not his fault that nobody wants to grind in the broad daylight.

bondax

Bondax were the closest thing to Disclosure on this year’s bill. The English duo are making sunshine-infused deep-house music that, unlike Shlohmo, was perfectly suited to the mild, daylight conditions. Armed with a slinky female singer and a male who was slightly past his prime, the pair tailored a light, breezy set for an excitable and tipsy crowd. It was refreshing to see a live set amongst many DJs, with the pair performing mostly their own songs.

The track that started it all for them, Baby I Got That, brought with it an undeniable groove, while their super-smooth single Gold, showed that they can perfectly induce a bit of deep house with RnB. The height of the set came with their cover of Duke Dumont’s I Got U. For a crowd that wasn’t very familiar with their material, they were content throughout the whole thing. It was an example of perfect scheduling and weather-appropriate music.

ChetFaker

Chet Faker was possibly the most hyped name on the bill, after Flume, and he effortlessly filled the paddock to usher in the night time. There’s no doubt that his one-man show is a marvel and he did all the right things at Listen Out. 1998 was soulful where it needed to be and beat-laden when dancing was needed while Gold created an unexpected singalong. I’m Into You was the perfect partner for the dusky heat and had the thick crowd swaying in admiration.

Despite his moments of brilliance, a one-man show like Faker’s is best enjoyed in tighter confines. Some of the sound was lost in the expanse of the crowd and sounded a little thin at times. His moments of playing with his instruments were also a little unnecessary as some began to get restless. A festival crowd, after all, has limited patience.

zhu

Enigmatic producer Zhu could’ve answered all the questions at Listen Out but instead he answered none. He took to the stage with a screen covering him from anybody’s vision and launched straight into his mega-hit Faded. It was a euphoric, throbbing moment but the whole time it felt there needed to be another climax. You couldn’t tell whether he was singing nor see what he was playing and no matter how good it there was always the feeling that the crowd wanted more – probably brought on by the lack of presence.

Despite not seeing him, he had some great moments. His remix of Lana Del Rey’s West Coast was a moment of chopped and sliced brilliance and the light show that carried on through the whole set was a spectacle. His set-finishing cover of CHVRCHES’ Gun was also a hands-in-the-air moment that ushered in a rare singalong. With a huge set under his belt already it’s hard to imagine how long Zhu will be able to keep this mystery up. It seems to do nothing but put more pressure on him to speak with great music.

teed

With the sun completely gone, Orlando Higginbottom brought with him the type of DJ set that only the night time would embrace. Gone was the summertime sounds that permeated the afternoon, as the crowd welcomed a fist-full of bass, with a set of largely unrecognisable music. T.E.E.D is clearly a producer who digs a little bit deeper than most but he never came across as pretentious. For every instrumental banger, there was crowd-pleaser thrown in. They came in the way of the bombastic Core by RL Grime and Ain’t Nobody by Chaka Khan which radiated through an excitable crowd.

It’s obvious by his latest track with Aussie, Anna Lunoe, that T.E.E.D’s musical output is altering slightly but it’s no less impressive. Feels Like was a nugget of gold in the set- a slowly building, throbber that commanded the crowd to go harder. He finished valiantly on Household Goods, ensuring we got a little taster of just what to expect when he comes back (hopefully) soon with his live show.

flume

Listen Out could’ve only announced Flume on the bill and still pulled a massive crowd. He’s the golden-boy of Australian dance music and this truly felt like a homecoming victory run. His set hasn’t changed much since his solo tour earlier this year, but it was his first major Australian Festival headline set and it went down very well. Still looking humbled by his overwhelming popularity, he dropped hit after hit. Sleepless was followed by Holdin’ On which was topped by his Hyperparadise remix. He barely even needed to say or do anything, the crowd was so enamoured with his tracks as just an audible spectacle.

He was happy to share the spotlight for a little as he brought on label-mate George Maple for a new track and her new single, Talk Talk. The pair meshed perfectly together in a display of vocal prowess and intricate production- the most seductive numbers of his entire set. His remix of Lorde’s Tennis Court and On Top further proved the strength of the catalogue he’s gathered in a short time. Naysayers may call him overrated, but there’s very few Australian artists who can command an audience like Flume does purely with his own material.

Check out our Listen Out pics here. 

SBTRKT_Review

SBTRKT’s ‘Wonder Where We Land’ reviewed

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London producer SBTRKT has released his new album Wonder Where We Land today and the title alone leaves a lot up in the air. We’ve heard a bunch of songs from the album but none of them have really given us a huge clue as to the overall direction of the album. We’ve spent the whole week with the album, much of it in the air, but now we’ve finally landed in a land of jazz-infused beats, twists and turns and soulful vocals. We were left a little lost for words so instead we made variations of the SBTRKT mask as a way of reviewing the album…and then we found our words again so we added some for your convenience.

Wonder Where We Land (Ft. Sampha)

Wonderwhereweland

Indeed. SBTRKT’s debut album etched out such an iconic sound, there was always a question above what we would get. With gentle taps, sporadic keys and Sampha up front, this is the SBTRKT we’ve always known, however there’s always that hovering doubt of where he’s going to take the rest of the record.

Lantern

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And this is where we land – right in the heart of an 8-bit world built upon strobing synths and J-pop beats, all the while a lurking atmosphere creeps up behind you. Three songs in and the darkness has been present in each. SBTRKT’s always been a producer who’s beautifully soundtracked the move from the club to the home and it’s no different here.

Higher (Ft. Raury)

Higher_RauryRaury is the most hyped young-gun on the album and he’s been recruited to help take the album to church. While Raury’s rap rolls off the tongue as quick as liquor slides over it, it’s all about that luminous chorus. Raise your hands to the air child, you have been saved.

Look Away (Ft. Caroline Polachek)

LookAway

While the darkness hovers throughout the album, it completely floods this track. Caroline Polachek’s heighty vocals are haunting and over-kilter throughout with an unsettling piano, enticing you to look. Polacheck brings a hip-hop flavour to the verses in what is an altogether odd but wonderfully successful detour for SBTRKT.

Temporary View (Ft. Sampha)

Temporary View

Sampha pops up four times on the album, but this one is the most similar to his contributions on the debut. It’s soulful, minimal and glittering but it really adds nothing to an album that thrives on moments of oddity. Following Look Away, this one centres you once again, making you comfortable but not excited.

NEW DORP. NEW YORK. (Ft. Ezra Koenig)

NewDorpNewYorkMask

Who better than to sing on an anthem about New York than Ezra Keonig? Alicia Keys did well and we tip our hat to her but Koenig embodies that sleek, socialite side of New York. Meanwhile, SBTRKT drops his most out of the box beat, oscillating between indie pop and jangling, warehouse electronica. SBTRKT knows, if he can make it here, he’ll make it anywhere.

Everybody Knows

EverybodyKnows

This one takes us straight into the heart of London. It’s grimey and the most intricate track on the album- a tribute to Jamie xx and those who spin beats on rooftops with a rare glimpse of London sunshine. There’s jilted keys, a throbbing beat and a hesitance that says “don’t dance, look cool”.

Problem Solved (Ft. Jessie Ware)

jessiewaremaskJessie Ware also collaborated with SBTRKT on his debut and she’s back her as a fully fledged star. With her new found stardom she could’ve easily overshone SBTRKT but she delivers a beautifully understated vocal over a jazz-infused beat. This pairing feels completely naturally and as such it’s the most effortless track on the album.

If It Happens (ft. Sampha)

IfItHappens

Sampha is in the blinding spotlight here, with SBTRKT taking a backseat allowing Sampha to sing like a love-lorn singer in a smokey jazz club. It’s a well-deserved breather and a warming track – an example of how SBTRKT can succeed with simplicity.

Gon Stay (ft. Sampha)

GonStay

It’s Sampha hour now and he’s cheered up a bit since the last track. For the first time, there’s no sign of that looming darkness – it’s full sunshine delivered through funky bass and a perky snare. It’s more indie-pop than London electronica but we’ll take it as a welcome flood of light into an otherwise shadowy album.

The Light (Ft. Denai Moore)

TheLight

It’s perhaps ironic that the light disappears on a song titled after it. Upcoming London songstress Denai Moore steps up on this heart-wrenching track. “Tell me I’m not the only one,” Moore sings sounding completely devoid of any more energy. At the same time, SBTRKT keeps upping the density of the track ending right in the thick of swelling emotion.

Voices In My Head (Ft. A$AP FERG)

Voicesinmyhead

It may take until the final track but here it all comes together. SBTRKT’s penchant for live instrumentation melds perfectly with his signature beats and the unsettling keys create an odd yet followable melody. A$AP Ferg’s rap is so full of character and woozy that you almost forget how batshit weird the whole thing is. If weird is the flavour of the album, then this track is the best indication that SBTRKT can pull it off with the utmost style.

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The 10 Commandments of Kanye West: Concert Review

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When Kanye West, Kim Kardashian and North West touch down in a country, there’s always going to be some fanfare. While Kim has been visiting the the country’s hotspots like Paramatta Westfield, Kanye has been making headlines with his powerful Yeezus tour. Despite the rants and reportedly telling disabled people to stand up, Kanye’s tour has been met with adoration. With Kanye in mind as the modern messiah, we analysed his 10 commandments while devouring his Sydney show.

I

The audience was incredibly responsive on Saturday night, whether it be from a single note in Runaway or the slight mention of Kim & North . The night before, he ranted about people not standing up, but on Saturday the crowd both started and ended the evening standing up, of their own accord, albeit a little more sweaty. Energy permeated the whole room with punters yelling to the hook in Gold Digger or calling back, “can’t a young nigger get money any more?” on Cold. It felt like a room of his biggest fans and of course, when he replaced a lyric in Good Life to say “It feel like Sydney”, everyone went batshit cray.

II

Kanye is an exhibitionist – an artist who’s made a career on being larger than life. His last album, My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, brought with it a live show with dancers, cranes and pyrotechnics, however, with Yeezus there has been a remarkable shift in attitude. The Yeezus tour was formed on the pretense that less is more. All he was accompanied by were two large screens and a few smoke machines; it was up to him to create the energy by aggressively rapping and stirring the crowd. Visually, it looked stunning, placing real Kanye as a mere ant against the god-like projections.

III

Kanye’s rants and general big headedness would have people believe that he’s self-centred but his setlist says a very different thing. He showed appreciation for his entire catalogue and formed a setlist that pleased the crowd and also pleased him. He only chose four cuts from Yeezus, spending much of the time churning out hits like Good Life, Jesus Walks and All Of The Lights. Much of his onstage energy seemed to be induced by the crowd’s energy and a greatest hits set that recognised what the crowd wanted was his greatest strength. And by the way, they all sounded incredible, from the hearty Rihanna hook of All of the Lights to that stomping brass sample of Touch The Sky.

IV

Throughout the night, Kanye paid homage  to his past inspirations, The Rolling Stones, U2 and his favourite artist of all time, James Brown. “I had the opportunity to open up for U2 on my second album”, he said, bringing up a particularly topical point, given the release of U2’s iTunes-infiltrating album. Despite having an ego larger than Darling Harbour, West has always been able to admit the brilliance of others, offering praise to rappers like Jay Z and Lil Wayne. Even when Pusha T came out in Runaway, he gracefully shared both the stage and the spotlight.

V

When Kanye released his difficult fourth album, 808s and Heartbreak, everyone scoffed at his use of auto-tune, yet on Yeezus, he used auto-tune from Hold My Liquor to Blood on the Leaves and no one flinched. His commitment to auto-tune seems to have paid off and in concert it’s actually quite emotionally affecting. He extended Runaway into a 10 minute-plus epic, ad-linking with auto-tuned vocals that sounded more Maxwell than T-Pain. Auto-tune seems to be one of the few ways that Kanye shows fragility. When he sang ,”all things are possible”, it created one of the more delicate moments of the night.

viKanye has always held his mother, Donda West, who tragically passed away in 2007, in high regard. On his last tour for My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, he finished every set on his knees to Hey Mama, in one of the hugest, most humble moments of his career. On the Yeezus tour, he’s dropped Hey Mama from the set but her presence is no less felt. He called her his greatest influence alongside U2 and the Rolling Stones, to which everyone in the crowd cheered.

VII

Kanye’s rants weren’t extremely aggressive in Sydney but he said a few poignant things. “I take my responsibility very seriously”, he remarked at one point, referring to the way people are influenced by him. With it, he thanked those who stood by him through his artistic detours (808s and Heartbreak) and noted that he takes his audience’s opinion on board, whilst at times it may not seem like it. Although Yeezus was not the most radio-friendly album, the tour was crafted by a Kanye that was there to stir the audience into complete anarchy.

VIII

One of the highlights of the night came with Yeezus standout, Blood On The Leaves. Returning for an encore, the Nina Simone sample bellowed through the arena before Kanye emerged with auto-tune fragility. For those who didn’t know the song, it would’ve lulled them into a false sense of security. When the TNGHT sample dropped, the entire arena shook. Kanye threw himself around within an inch of his life, the lights strobed in anarchy and the bass absolutely tore a hole in the roof. It was a valiant, triumphant moment that even beat set-closer, Niggas In Paris. 

IX

It may seem hard to believe, but arena-tours can often swallow performers. If you don’t have the stage presence or the audience on your side, it doesn’t matter how many dancers you throw on, you’ve already lost. Standing against two large screens, Kanye looked like a mere man against a huge projection of himself, but he was by far the biggest person there. The reason? He was committed from the beginning to the end. If it didn’t feel right he’d start the song again, as he did on Runaway and Blood On The Leaves, and if the huge crowd was dipping, he’d let out a primal scream. From the minute he entered the stage to the thundering finale Black Skinhead, he was like a boxer attempting to knock-out the air around him. The music was loud, real loud. Songs like New Slaves and Power threatened to belittle him but his menacing confidence meant he always won, stealing the limelight by just having himself- one body- on the stage.

XKanye did a talk at SXSW where he said that if he’s going to work with something, he wants it to be the best. That’s why he waxes lyrical about Apple, works with Jay Z and married Kim K- he believes they’re the best. Incidentally, he also believe he’s the best and while it’s easy to take it as reckless arrogance, none of Kanye’s music would work if he didn’t believe he was the best. At the height of his popularity, he released an album like Yeezus, which is an industrial and, at times, difficult record, yet live, he has an audience of 15,000+ rapping along with him to New Slaves. “Don’t get too caught up in the hate,” he says at one point in the show and while at many times in his career he has, tonight he seems at peace. His last Australian tour was perfect, glued together by a pristine white set and flawless dancers. Yeezus is nothing like that. At times it’s gritty, raw and imperfect, yet Kanye wholeheartedly believes in it and as such, so does the crowd.

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10 Songs You Need To Hear This Week 29 August

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Shine, shine, shine. It’s Friday once again and the week has delivered us an awfully large bucket of audible material. With Spring in the air and the drinks in full flow, nobody has time to trawl through new music. Luckily, we get a serious case of hayfever in the Springtime and are better off inside with the headphones on. We’re trading pollen for beats and serving up the best music this week had to offer.

Click here for the TL;DR Soundcloud playlist.

ILOVEMAKONNEN & Drake- Tuesday (Star Slinger Remix)

It’s slightly arrogant to think that you could make this track any better, but UK producer, Star Slinger may just have done it. He’s turned this Tuesday testament into a house-driven delight, that takes cues from the hip-hop dance crossover of Vic Mensa’s Down On My Luck. With delectable keys and a relentless beat, this remix may be even more likely to make the club go up on a Tuesday.

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/starslingeruk/ilovemakonnen-tuesday-feat-drake-star-slinger-house-edit[/soundcloud]

Say Lou Lou- Instant Crush (Daft Punk Cover)

It’s been more than a year since Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories, but it hasn’t been forgotten. Swedish duo Say Lou Lou have kept the Daft Punk flame alive, covering Julian Casablanca’s featuring, Instant Crush. Melodically they keep things the same, but they add revelling stings of guitar and a hazy atmosphere, that compliments their ghostly harmonies. It’s all a little bit gloomy, but life’s a little like that sometimes, ain’t it?

SOHN – The Chase 

SOHN has been busy lately. Releasing his album, Tremors, earlier in the year, in conjunction with producing with both Banks and Kwabs the British dance producer has now released the atmospheric The Chase. His emotive vocals shivering through bubbling synths and intriguing glitches, this track may be just a ‘demo’ but it’s certainly at a standard to be featured on an album.

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/sohn/the-chase[/soundcloud]

Lowell- LGBT

Lowell’s Bells cemented this Canadian songstress as one of the most exciting female-voices right now and she’s continued the streak of brilliance with LGBT. The title suggests that LGBT is an anthem like Lady Gaga’s Born This Way, but it doesn’t go that far. Instead it seems to be a subtle cultural comment on not holding prejudice. During she sings, “Some young people are smarter than their teachers”, over a stomping beat and dazzling synths. It’s the perfect way to let people know that Gen Y is on top right now. She’s got an album coming out soon called We Loved Her Dearly and we’re probably going to love it dearly too, to be honest.

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/artsandcrafts/lowell-lgbt[/soundcloud]

Emile Haynie- A Kiss Goodbye (Feat. Charlotte Gainsbourg, Devonte Hynes and Sampha)

It’s as if this song was born in hipster heaven. American producer, Emile Haynie has brought together Dev Hynes, Sampha and Charlotte Gainsbourg together to collectively deliver an odd yet affecting song. At times it sounds operatic, other times whimsical, while Sampha also takes it to church on his verse. It will take a few listens to figure out what the hell is going on but once you get your head around it, it reveals itself as a stunning prelude to the resolution of a film.

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/emile-haynie/a-kiss-goodbye-featuring-charlotte-gainsbourg-devonte-hynes-and-sampha[/soundcloud]

Arms and Sleepers – Swim Team 

This is one for those choosing to stay in this weekend. The chill-pop tune oscillates between quivering percussion, dreamy synths, plucky strings and romantic vocals, creating a kaleidoscope of colours and textures.

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/arms-and-sleepers/swim-team[/soundcloud]

Tinashe- Pretend (Feat. A$AP Rocky)

First she dropped Vulnerable and everyone sat up, then she unveiled 2 On and everyone got real low and now with Pretend she’s proven she’s a bonafide RnB star. With Tinashe, there are no bells and whistles. She relies on a heartfelt melody with moody beats and a subtle climax which in this case comes in the way of A$AP Rocky’s brilliant verse. Instead of turning it up a notch for the chorus, she mellows it out, stripping the track of its beat and slowing her syllables. It’s a choice move that makes the track sound completely effortless. Ain’t no need to pretend, Tinashe is the real deal.

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/tinashenow/tinashe-pretend-featuring-aap-rocky[/soundcloud]

Sophie & A.G.Cook – Hey QT  

We’ve had this sugary sweet pop tune on repeat all week with no symptoms of a sugar headache just yet. Dropped around the same time that Aqua announced an Australian reunion tour, it’s looking like nostalgia and Nintendo on the horizon, and we’re totally okay with that. Get your dollar coins out: it’s Dance Dance Revolution time.

Basenji – Heirloom 

Sydney-based beatsmith, Basenji has delivered his first release since signing with Future Classic earlier in the year. Infused with Oriental-inspired percussion and an bassline, Heirloom takes you down the Rainbow Road and will have you instantly addicted. It’s free to download via the Future Classic Soundcloud page.

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/futureclassic/basenji-heirloom[/soundcloud]

Sam Sure – Hunger 

Debuting his single, Hunger, today on BBC Radio 1 with Zane Lowe, singer-songwriter Sam Sure immediately had us wanting more.  Understated synths and a steady beat allow Sure’s ethereal voice to shine through on the electronic-come-R&B track. With precise production and perfectly-combined layers, it is a shining debut from the UK artist. Hunger is out on October 13th via iTunes.

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/sam-sure/sam-sure-hunger[/soundcloud]

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Rusty the dog reviews Rustie’s album, ‘Green Language’

RustieRustie‘s latest album, Green Language, is, as expected, an amalgamation of sound. Never forgiving, it’s a wild world through hip-hop and techno stylings. He’s created an 8-bit video-game world from bouncing, strobing and glitchy synths alongside tempos that spiral out of control. At time it’s beautiful, at times it’s anarchic but it’s always interesting and boundary-pushing. To review the album we pulled in a canine fan of Rustie, also conveniently named Rusty and let him react to the plethora of weird and wonderful sounds that Green Language has to offer.

1. Workship

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This sprawling, atmospheric beginning is barely enough to pique Rusty’s interests, but the ears are ready and he seems to feel the impending doom that is to come.

2. A Glimpse

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This is the first time on the album we get a hard delivery of bass. That coupled with twinkling synths and big cannons of sound have Rusty up and ready to hear what the Scottish producer will deliver next.

3. Raptor

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That next song is Raptor, the first single which offers up manic, strobing synths and a beat that shoots straight to the chest. Just like Rustie has become known for, this track is an onslaught of sound, borrowing trap-influences for a little variation. Rusty’s bored demeanour show that he too feels that Rustie has given us a bit of the same here.

4. Paradise Stone

song4Song4_2song4_3

Now we’re talking. Those tropical synths have Rusty feeling playful. He’s been able to recline, pop the ear up and relax taking in this warm, mellow instrumental.

5. Up Down [ft. D Double E]

Rustie_song5

This is the first time we get to hear vocals on the album and Rusty is obliging with the direction nodding his head up and down. As a hip-hop track, it’s flavoursome, dense and rhythmic while it also works well as dance track, if you have two feet firmly planted and the knees bent.

6. Attak [ft. Danny Brown]

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/rustie/attak-feat-danny-brown[/soundcloud]

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As soon as that opening alarm sounds Rusty is ready to go hard. He’s off the chair for the first time and running around the room like Danny Brown in the video. It’s the most anarchic moment of the album with Brown barely pausing for a breath and as such, it’s impossible not to notice. A perfect centrepiece for an album by a producer who’s never been soft.

7. Tempest

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Once again Rustie follows-up a pacing track with a slower, dazzler. After the heart-raiser that was Attak, Rusty is more than happy to return to his throne and gaze out the window. Surely the world is turning into a video-game for him inspired by the 8-bit feel of this track.

8. He Hate Me [ft. Gorgeous Children]

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This is the most outright hip-hop moment on the album. A cascading beat is basically the only thing backing up Gorgeous Children, on the sparse, He Hate Me. Rusty seems to have developed a penchant for Rustie’s dance-heavy side and sees this track as an opportunity to sleep.

9. Velcro

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The abrasive synths are back and Rusty is interrupted from his slumber. The song grows into gun-shot beats and perhaps, one of the grooviest bass-lines yet. Rusty cowers in his chair before realising this song is best digested standing up.

10. Lost [ft. Redinho]

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Vocal manipulation pops up for the first time on Lost and it’s a sound that barely registers for Rusty. Instead he gets lost in the leopard print throw he’s made his own. Nothing to see here.

11. Dream On

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This track is built upon a hazy, dreamscape and future RnB vocals that bring the tempo right down for a rare moment. Rusty has decided to take a kip but his ears are twitching every so often. This one’s a sleeper, but it’s probably best listened to in a slight daydream. Melodically, it slides over you like velvet.

12. Let’s Spiral

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Probably realising we’re close to the end of the album, Rusty has decided to enjoy this one on his feet. The triumphant, strobing synths are joined by loud clashes and it’s got Rusty doing a spiral of his own.

13. Green Language

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It’s a pleasant fade out, that allows the album to twinkle away. As has Rusty who has left his throne to grab some water and leave work for the day.

 

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The anatomy of Ariana Grande’s ‘My Everything’

Ariana Grande’s last album, Yours Truly, showed so much promise. The former Nickelodeon star emerged as a woman with stylish RnB undertones and a voice that harks back to Mariah Carey’s glory days. The problem with Yours Truly was that at times it felt a little old-fashioned and slipped into ballad territory too often. On album number two, My Everything, she’s rectified those problems.

Just looking at the production notes of the album is like reading a list of the biggest producers in pop right now. She’s pulled in Max Martin, Zedd, Benny Blanco, Darkchild and newbies like Cashmere Cat and Lido to deliver an album that sounds acutely aware of the current musical climax. First single, Problem, is one of the biggest pop songs of the years thanks to its genius brass hook and her second single Break Free is an EDM banger that showcases Grande’s voice expertly. Together the two tracks tell a tale of what is popular in the charts right now- RnB and dance-pop.

Every song on the album could easily make an indent on the chart but it doesn’t feel like My Everything has been made purely to please the masses. By pulling in rappers like A$AP Ferg and Childish Gambino, she’s embracing a whole new audience, usually snobby to popstars with this status. The album’s biggest risk is pulling in Norwegian producer Cashmere Cat but it pays off in droves. His track, Be My Baby, is an album highlight with Grande’s voice trilling at its giddy heights over a cascading beat.

Some of the most impressive moments come when she treads a careful line between dance-pop and RnB. Love Me Harder is built on a dense bed of synths and throbbing bass with Grande and guest vocalist, The Weeknd adding the soul. One Last Time is also an understated, bass-pumper with a chorus that never completely takes off with Grande choosing melody over vocal-belting. It’s a wise choice.

The album strays into ballad territory twice on the title track and on the Harry Styles-penned, Just A Little Bit Of Your Heart and they do very little for the record. Thankfully she follows up the latter with the bizarre, brass-sampling, Hands On Me, which helps things get interesting again. A$AP’s first venture into a pop-feature is a chest-puffed, obnoxious verse which suits the track perfectly.

My Everything is not perfect. At times the ballads get a little self-indulgent and it jumps around genres fervently but it’s a product of a music world where trends are constantly changing. By taking a bass of RnB and building on that, Grande has delivered an album that makes sense as a whole. The songs individually, however, are pearlers. Rarely does a track feel like a filler, rather sounding like she’s pulled out the big guns for every moment. In terms of the big sellers this year, My Everything would have to be one of the best. 7.5/10

See below as we further explore the anatomy of My Everything. 

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Why the hell did they Shazam that? We review Tomorrowland’s Top 10 Tracks

tomorrowlandshazamTomorrowland finished up last weekend in Belgium with thousands of EDM fans heading back to their home countries to rest their sore heads and frazzled minds. inthemix has published the Top 10 Most Shazamed Songs throughout the event’s two weekends and the results are unsurprisingly full of EDM bangers. Two of our writers with the least patience towards EDM agreed to review the 10 tracks and give themselves an education in four-to-the-floor, hands-in-the-air EDM.

All jokes aside, there are many reasons why Tomorrowland is one of the best festivals of its kind.

10. R3hab- & Deorro- Flashlight

[soundcloud width=”700″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/r3hab/r3hab-deorro-flashlight[/soundcloud]

Bianca: Had to take extra care there to include the ‘3’ in R3hab.

Sam: That trumpet synth is giving me a heart-attack. At one point I thought the build-up was never going to end. Oscillates between a trumpet and farting noises. If the farting noise was intentional, I’m in favour of the novelty.

Bianca: This isn’t a case of when will the bass drop, but why. The build up is so fucking intense, I never want it to end. :'(

Sam: Aaaaand a completely different track after 1:40

Bianca: I’m peaking.

9. David Guetta ft. Sam Martin – Lovers on the Sun

[soundcloud width=”700″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/avicii-music-holland/david-guetta-ft-avicii-sam-martin-lovers-on-the-sun[/soundcloud]

Sam: That voice is almost as offensive as Nickelback.

Bianca: I’ve never heard a song before where the whistling was so completely unwelcome and unnecessary.

Sam: “Surprise motherfucker” one person comments when the twinkling synth comes in. Indeed. The bluegrass thing worked for Avicii but the Western stylings of this one for Guetta are woeful.

Bianca: The real question is…who in their right mind would bother to go through the process of bringing out their phone, unlocking it, opening the Shazam app, pressing the button and holding their hand up to the sky for a good 5 seconds so that they could have a record of this song?

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Oh, right. Nobody was in their right mind.

8. Zhu – Faded

[soundcloud width=”700″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/zhu/faded[/soundcloud]

Bianca: I like this song and would Shazam it too…if Tomorrowland was 3 months ago. How does no one know the name of it by now?

Sam: I suppose it’s one of the better ones here and of course a song about getting wasted is going to appear in this list. There’s just absolutely no dynamics or anything interesting apart from a wistful voice singing he’s wasted. Jessica Mauboy’s Pop A Bottle is more successful than this.

7. Secondcity- I Wanna Feel

[soundcloud width=”700″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/secondcityuk/secondcity-i-wanna-feel-radio[/soundcloud]

Sam: Deep house penetrates Tomorrowland, could this be the end of EDM? Judging by the rest of list, definitely not. It’s been a massive hit in the UK and is probably heading for Australia. I suppose it’s an inoffensive enough slice of disco-house.

Bianca: At least this one has words. And it’s nice to have a little Toni Braxton influence but I honestly would’ve preferred Unbreak My Heart.

6. Netsky- Running Low

[soundcloud width=”700″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/netsky/running-low-feat-beth-ditto[/soundcloud]

Bianca: Why do EDM voices always have to be so…heavy and overly soulful? The beat is already intense, there’s no need for the double whammy.

Sam: I really like Beth Ditto’s voice but oh my goodness that drum ‘n’ bass whacks you right in the stomach. How do you dance to this? Please someone send tutorials.

Bianca: Oh, didn’t realise it was Beth Ditto. Probably shouldn’t have used ‘heavy’ as one of my adjectives…

Sam: Once again there’s a lyric about drinking a lot.

5. Ommet Ozcan- Raise Your Hand

[soundcloud width=”700″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/ummetozcan/ummet-ozcan-raise-your-hands[/soundcloud]

Sam: At least I knew what to do from the title.

Bianca: Am I allowed to raise both? In surrender, I mean.

Sam: I’d be out as soon as those trance synths hit. Take me to the clouds above.

Bianca: Can I get a read-out on what the Soundcloud peeps are saying?

“Sweet”

“Add me”

“Sick”

“No. Just no.”

“Turkey”

“Dirty”

“And 1, 2, 3…Jump!”

Bianca: Probably agree with “No” & “Turkey”.

Sam: This is served to you right on a plate, with directions far easier than an Ikea manual.

Bianca: I think people did what the song intended them to do- to raise their hands- but they accidentally opened up Shazam in the process.

4. Dimitri Vegas & MOGUAI & Like Mike – Mammoth (Original Mix)

[soundcloud width=”700″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/dimitrivegasandlikemike/dimitri-vegas-moguai-like-mike[/soundcloud]

Sam: I’m really beginning to feel like I’m taking multiple bullets to the head. I can imagine pulling out my phone and shazaming it for lack of knowing what else to possibly do.

Bianca: I think this hairy situation needs to stay in the Ice Age.

Sam: At this point I’m struggling to find different adjectives to describe very similar tracks.

Bianca: Might I suggest, “heavy”?

3. Dimitri Vangelis & Wyman & Steve Angello- Payback

[soundcloud width=”700″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/sizerecords/payback-original-mix[/soundcloud]

Sam: My hands are still in the air from Ommet Ozcan tune and I’m yet to be directed to put them down. Another screaming EDM banger with a drop that feels like a meteor. I’m guessing Tomorrowland was the only festival where Outkast weren’t on the bill?

Bianca: Look, it might be a bit unfair to be judging these songs from behind my computer screen, with a lemon and ginger tea in my hand on a cold Tuesday afternoon. I guess you can’t truly rate a banger like this when you’re not surrounded by thousands and thousands of your closest friends.

2. Watermat- Bullit

[soundcloud width=”700″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/spinnin-deep/watermat-bullit-original-mix[/soundcloud]

Sam: Where’s the Titanium of this year’s Tomorrowland? I could do with a bit of Sia at this point.

Bianca: I wish Shazam had the capacity to tell you at what exact point these people Shazammed the tracks and were like “oh, shit! I need to remember this exact moment!” Was it the steady build? The peak? The drop?? So many questions!

Sam: It seems it’s all one in the same in this track. That whistling sound though is really something. Someone has commented on Soundcloud “so chill”. She must have an insanely hectic life.

Bianca: Sounds like an air raid over a Snake Charmer. Could be the second instalment to Outkast’s B.O.B: Bombs over Bombay.

Sam: Could it be the soundtrack to Slumdog Millionaire 2: From Rags to EDM Riches.

Bianca: When you got EDM riches you got bitches.

1. Dimitri Vegas, Martin Garrix and Like Mike- Tremor

[soundcloud width=”700″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/martingarrix/dimitri-vegas-martin-garrix-like-mike-tremor-sensation-2014-anthem-original-mix[/soundcloud]

Sam: I am petrified. Am I ready for this?

Bianca: Number one…Everything in my life has been leading to this very moment.

Sam: Does anyone break ribcages at Tomorrowland? My poor little laptop, I promise I’ll put on some Dido for you to recover afterwards.

Bianca: Really glad they had the countdown there so I knew exactly where the drop was.

Sam: …but in all seriousness this is in every way a #banger

Bianca: So many peaks and troughs I don’t know what to do with myself. I might just have a lie down. Can I get a top up on my lemon & ginger tea?

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