Nobody Will Leave Hinds Alone

Written By Sam Murphy on 03/11/2016

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The formative years of a band are some of the most exciting but also the most stressful. You make your first statements to the world about what you’re going to be, deal with the hype or criticism and then often cram into a tour bus for months at a time.

Spanish four-piece Hinds sit at one of the most extreme ends of the spectrum. They were booking shows around the world as Deers when they only had a few tracks out and then went through a name change and successfully released an album Leave Me Alone that’s been received with rapturous applause all around the world. That may seem like mission complete but it’s not. The girls are now on a seemingly never-ending tour with shows booked right up until November this year.

It’s intense but if anyone’s going to thrive in this atmosphere it’s Hinds. They’re full of life, armed with raucous, energetic tunes and play each show as if they’re with the crowd not playing in front of the crowd.

The foursome currently have an Australian tour booked in for May, the band’s second trip to the country but first since the album was released. Eyeing those dates, we spoke to guitarist and vocalist Ana Garcia while in the midst of a sold-out tour of the UK about how to survive a hectic touring schedule and trust your instincts when you’re making something weird.

Where are you right now?
I’m in Birmingham. We’ve been like 13 days or so on tour so I’m seriously getting like lost like I don’t know where I am and I’m in the mic every night like “hey, what up city?” I have to really think about where I am. It’s terrible.

Are you moving from city to city everyday?
Yeah, we’re playing in Bristol tonight.

Is it still exciting or is it starting to get a little bit exhausting?
It’s both. We’ve been like almost a year touring non-stop. It gets very very exhausting because even when we’re touring it’s not just playing it’s travelling and doing so many interviews and doing press and everything. At the same time, all the venues are packed and this tour is sold out. Like all the UK dates were already sold out even before we started the tour so it gets very exciting. Whenever I’m like, “dude, I can’t play the show today I’m too tired or too sick or too sad,” then I think there’s 400 people waiting for you, very excited and you see people’s faces. You have to do it.

How are you recharging during the day? Are you trying to get as much sleep as you can or listening to music in your downtime?
Yeah. Actually both at the same time. We travel with the four of us and our tour manager and our sound engineer and our two friends who are helping us sell merch. It’s kind of hard to all squeeze in the van with so many people around. But we are stealing pillows from all the hotels to make it more comfortable. Now we seriously have around 13 pillows in our van and it’s not that big so it’s like pillow land. It’s a pyjama party or something. We try to sleep and with headphones.

It sounds like you’ve cracked the code and found the perfect way to tour.
Yes, we’re very experienced now.

How have you found touring after the record release as opposed to before it?
It’s great. It’s great. We had been touring a lot without the album and suddenly watching people singing songs that they didn’t sing before is amazing. It’s amazing, it’s like “oh my god, did you see they were singing the songs?” It’s very, very cool and very nice to see how people react to one song you thought they wouldn’t like. We knew Warts was going to be one of the best ones live because people were singing along live and actually Fat Calmed Kiddos had a better reaction than what we thought and then people are asking for the instrumental one. It’s like talking with people about stuff you do. It’s great people come to you and everyone has their own opinion of the album. That’s so interesting. It’s like, “whoah, you really think that,” or “whoah, maybe you’re right.”

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Quote1HINDS

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How did you find time in the hectic touring schedule to actually record an album?
We had to six or seven months before it happened. Like right now we’re starting to book tours for October next year. Whenever people are telling us come to whatever, I’m just like, “dude do you see how many cities we’re doing in one year?” We plan to go everywhere so our calendars are very blocked and we have to think about everything with a lot of time. Right now we have dates blocked until October or November but then we already have dates booked just to write because we’re stressed out. We want to have the second album in one year or one year and a half. We know if we want to write it we really have to start now.

Did you ever expect it could ever get insane this quickly given that there aren’t a lot of acts from Spain that are hugely popular on the international scene?
It’s not about how fast it went it’s about how far it’s going. I never ever thought this was going to happen. Our kind of music is very lo-fi, I didn’t know that so many people listen to that kind of music. My Mum when she first heard it she was like, “hmm, this is weird but I like it.” It’s crazy that we’re going so far with this kind of music.

QUOTE2HINDSWere there ever times when you doubted the sound or were worried that the album wasn’t going to be received so well?
Yeah we kind of had this moment. This was our very first time in a studio because the first single we recorded it in a rehearsal room and the second one was in a studio but it was in Berlin and it was a contest we won so we only had one day and it was a mess and the first time all of us were together recording something. So we were like we’re going to have this studio for 10 days and this is going to be our sound engineer and this is going to be our producer. We had no idea about how everything went. They told us we had to book four days just for mixing and we recorded in analogue so whenever we finished recording a song that was it because they did it with a tape. It was very stressful. We had no idea how to do it. At one point we were like maybe this is too lo-fi for an album. We were scared that we were pushing it too much and you couldn’t listen to 40 minutes of it. But at the end we were like it’s too early to change our style. An album that is too polished wouldn’t make sense. We’re too young to make a big step. It’s like, this is our first album, this is how we feel and how we’ve been doing it for the last couple of years. Next time it might be more produced or maybe not because it makes sense to change the sound. But also we really like it too.

It must be great to look back now and know people are loving it?
Yes. I’m always trying to be like, “no this is what we like, it doesn’t matter if people like it or not.” If people don’t like it then it’s like oh well never mind we tried it. But when we finished it was like, “I love our record.” To put out a record is so much work and so much time and so much pressure, It wasn’t for everyone else it was for us.

Do you read reviews or do you try and stay away from it?
No we actually haven’t read anything bad. Of course I haven’t read all of them but the main ones have been very very good and very surprisingly good. I can’t believe people get our message and stuff. I thought people were just going to think it sounds weird and messy. But we take a lot of time to write our songs and take care of everything like the cover of the album. We did it ourselves. I was very surprised that everyone is realising. We were talking with someone from our label and they were like, “dude, I think the fact that you’re Spanish, you’re probably one of the first bands where America and Japan and Australia and the UK all agree on”. It’s either America loves it and England hates it. Everyone is more open.

Yeah that’s cool. What is the indie-rock or lo-fi rock scene like in Madrid?
It’s the best. When we started we thought it was big but now we’re thinking it’s not very big at all. There’s a lot of garage and lo-fi band there that want to help each other. Our producer is one of our best friends from one band and another one shot our cover with his camera. Everyone helps each other.

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Hinds will be in Australia in May. Check out all the tour details here.
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The formative years of a band are some of the most exciting but also the most stressful. You make your first statements to the world about what you’re going to be, deal with the hype or criticism and then often cram into a tour bus for months at a time.

Spanish four-piece Hinds sit at one of the most extreme ends of the spectrum. They were booking shows around the world as Deers when they only had a few tracks out and then went through a name change and successfully released an album Leave Me Alone that’s been received with rapturous applause all around the world. That may seem like mission complete but it’s not. The girls are now on a seemingly never-ending tour with shows booked right up until November this year.

It’s intense but if anyone’s going to thrive in this atmosphere it’s Hinds. They’re full of life, armed with raucous, energetic tunes and play each show as if they’re with the crowd not playing in front of the crowd.

The foursome currently have an Australian tour booked in for May, the band’s second trip to the country but first since the album was released. Eyeing those dates, we spoke to guitarist and vocalist Ana Garcia while in the midst of a sold-out tour of the UK about how to survive a hectic touring schedule and trust your instincts when you’re making something weird.

Where are you right now?
I’m in Birmingham. We’ve been like 13 days or so on tour so I’m seriously getting like lost like I don’t know where I am and I’m in the mic every night like “hey, what up city?” I have to really think about where I am. It’s terrible.

Are you moving from city to city everyday?
Yeah, we’re playing in Bristol tonight.

Is it still exciting or is it starting to get a little bit exhausting?
It’s both. We’ve been like almost a year touring non-stop. It gets very very exhausting because even when we’re touring it’s not just playing it’s travelling and doing so many interviews and doing press and everything. At the same time, all the venues are packed and this tour is sold out. Like all the UK dates were already sold out even before we started the tour so it gets very exciting. Whenever I’m like, “dude, I can’t play the show today I’m too tired or too sick or too sad,” then I think there’s 400 people waiting for you, very excited and you see people’s faces. You have to do it.

How are you recharging during the day? Are you trying to get as much sleep as you can or listening to music in your downtime?
Yeah. Actually both at the same time. We travel with the four of us and our tour manager and our sound engineer and our two friends who are helping us sell merch. It’s kind of hard to all squeeze in the van with so many people around. But we are stealing pillows from all the hotels to make it more comfortable. Now we seriously have around 13 pillows in our van and it’s not that big so it’s like pillow land. It’s a pyjama party or something. We try to sleep and with headphones.

It sounds like you’ve cracked the code and found the perfect way to tour.
Yes, we’re very experienced now.

How have you found touring after the record release as opposed to before it?
It’s great. It’s great. We had been touring a lot without the album and suddenly watching people singing songs that they didn’t sing before is amazing. It’s amazing, it’s like “oh my god, did you see they were singing the songs?” It’s very, very cool and very nice to see how people react to one song you thought they wouldn’t like. We knew Warts was going to be one of the best ones live because people were singing along live and actually Fat Calmed Kiddos had a better reaction than what we thought and then people are asking for the instrumental one. It’s like talking with people about stuff you do. It’s great people come to you and everyone has their own opinion of the album. That’s so interesting. It’s like, “whoah, you really think that,” or “whoah, maybe you’re right.”

Quote1HINDS

How did you find time in the hectic touring schedule to actually record an album?
We had to six or seven months before it happened. Like right now we’re starting to book tours for October next year. Whenever people are telling us come to whatever, I’m just like, “dude do you see how many cities we’re doing in one year?” We plan to go everywhere so our calendars are very blocked and we have to think about everything with a lot of time. Right now we have dates blocked until October or November but then we already have dates booked just to write because we’re stressed out. We want to have the second album in one year or one year and a half. We know if we want to write it we really have to start now.

Did you ever expect it could ever get insane this quickly given that there aren’t a lot of acts from Spain that are hugely popular on the international scene?
It’s not about how fast it went it’s about how far it’s going. I never ever thought this was going to happen. Our kind of music is very lo-fi, I didn’t know that so many people listen to that kind of music. My Mum when she first heard it she was like, “hmm, this is weird but I like it.” It’s crazy that we’re going so far with this kind of music.

QUOTE2HINDSWere there ever times when you doubted the sound or were worried that the album wasn’t going to be received so well?
Yeah we kind of had this moment. This was our very first time in a studio because the first single we recorded it in a rehearsal room and the second one was in a studio but it was in Berlin and it was a contest we won so we only had one day and it was a mess and the first time all of us were together recording something. So we were like we’re going to have this studio for 10 days and this is going to be our sound engineer and this is going to be our producer. We had no idea about how everything went. They told us we had to book four days just for mixing and we recorded in analogue so whenever we finished recording a song that was it because they did it with a tape. It was very stressful. We had no idea how to do it. At one point we were like maybe this is too lo-fi for an album. We were scared that we were pushing it too much and you couldn’t listen to 40 minutes of it. But at the end we were like it’s too early to change our style. An album that is too polished wouldn’t make sense. We’re too young to make a big step. It’s like, this is our first album, this is how we feel and how we’ve been doing it for the last couple of years. Next time it might be more produced or maybe not because it makes sense to change the sound. But also we really like it too.

It must be great to look back now and know people are loving it?
Yes. I’m always trying to be like, “no this is what we like, it doesn’t matter if people like it or not.” If people don’t like it then it’s like oh well never mind we tried it. But when we finished it was like, “I love our record.” To put out a record is so much work and so much time and so much pressure, It wasn’t for everyone else it was for us.

Do you read reviews or do you try and stay away from it?
No we actually haven’t read anything bad. Of course I haven’t read all of them but the main ones have been very very good and very surprisingly good. I can’t believe people get our message and stuff. I thought people were just going to think it sounds weird and messy. But we take a lot of time to write our songs and take care of everything like the cover of the album. We did it ourselves. I was very surprised that everyone is realising. We were talking with someone from our label and they were like, “dude, I think the fact that you’re Spanish, you’re probably one of the first bands where America and Japan and Australia and the UK all agree on”. It’s either America loves it and England hates it. Everyone is more open.

Yeah that’s cool. What is the indie-rock or lo-fi rock scene like in Madrid?
It’s the best. When we started we thought it was big but now we’re thinking it’s not very big at all. There’s a lot of garage and lo-fi band there that want to help each other. Our producer is one of our best friends from one band and another one shot our cover with his camera. Everyone helps each other.

Hinds will be in Australia in May. Check out all the tour details here.

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